Title:
A College Freshman in 1858

Author:
Lawrence Wheeler

Date:
1951

Source:
Indiana Magazine of History, Volume 47, Issue 3, pp 267-298

Article Type:
Article

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A College Freshman in 1858

Lawrence Wheeler∗

Freshmen in college more than ninety years ago were much like students of the mid-twentieth century. They studied a little, they had many dates, they participated in all the recreational facilities available, they hurried home at vacation time, worked on the farm and hurried back to the campus.

The day-by-day diary of John Henry Louden, who entered Indiana University in the 1857-1858 school year, gives surprising insight into college activities as he saw them. Later to be one of Indiana's well-known attorneys, Louden was a native of Louden County, Pennsylvania, where he was born November 24, 1835. His family moved to Dunlapsville, Indiana, in the southwest part of Union County, five miles southwest of Liberty and eight miles southeast of Connersville. The village of three stores, six shops, a Presbyterian church and a hundred inhabitants was about a mile and a half from the Treaty line in the Whitewater Valley.

When he entered Indiana University, there were 116 college students and 92 in the preparatory department. He was a member of the Athenian Society, Sigma Chi and was graduated from the University in 1861 and received a degree in law in 1864.

Throughout his diary much reference is made to "Miss Lizzie" who was Elizabeth Chestnut Hemphill whom he married March 18, 1863. She was the youngest child of James K. and Eliza Millen Hemphill and was born in Bloomington in 1836 in her father's home which was back of his mercantile store (Hemphill and Labertow) on the west side of the public square, just north of the alley. She was a younger sister of Martha Jane Hemphill who married James Woodburn and was the mother of James Albert Woodburn.

"Miss Lizzie" was, in the words of her nephew, James Albert Woodburn, "a devoted Christian woman and was especially active in temperance work. After her death, in 1909, the


  • Lawrence Wheeler is professor of journalism and director of communications at Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana. He was assisted in the annotation of the Diary by Lloyd Setser and Mrs. Charlotte Rosenberg. The Louden Diary is deposited in the rare book collection of the Indiana University Library.
Women's Christian Temperance Union erected a memorial to her in the form of a drinking fountain at the southwest corner of the Square."

Theodore J. Louden, Ida Jane Coblentz, and William Mc-Nary Louden were the children of John Henry and Elizabeth Louden. When Colonel Theodore Louden closed his law office in Bloomington in 1950, he and his father had occupied legal quarters on the same site for nearly ninety years.

John Henry Louden died June 3, 1911, and is buried in Bloomington. His diary, as a college freshman and sophomore, follows:

Friday, January 1, 1858: Clear day. Felt inclined to wish that I was at home. Spent the day in reading, writing, loafering and playing ball. Very nice day for the commencement of the New Year and augurs well for the future.

Saturday, January 2: Clear day. Spent it pretty much the same as the former one. In the afternoon went with Calvin to Schermerhorn's room.1

Sunday, January 3: Clear and very pleasant day. Went to the A. R. Church to meeting. Walked home with Miss Lizzie.2 Read some. At night took my duck to the N.S. Church.3 Heard a very good sermon by Prof. Balantine on the New Year.4

Monday, January 4: Clear day. Went to college which opened to day.


  • 1 E. Calvin Cooper of Sparta, Illinois, was a sophomore. William W. Schermerhorn of Delphi was enrolled as a freshman and sophomore but did not graduate.
  • 2 Miss Lizzie was Elizabeth Chestnut Hemphill.
  • 3 N. S. refers to the New School Presbyterian church which resulted from a split in the late thirties. A. R. refers to the Associate Reformed Presbyterian church, later the United Presbyterian church. Lewis Cheeseman, Differences between Old and New School Presbyterians (Rochester, New York, 1848); The Semi-Centennial Anniversary of the United Presbyterian Congregation of Bloomington, Indiana (Blanchard, Iowa, 1883).
  • 4 Elisha Ballantine was born at Schodach Landing, New York, October 27, 1814. In 1834 he attended an academy in York, Pennsylvania, studied theology at Union Theological Seminary in Virginia, and in 1834-1835, at Halle and Leipzig in Germany. From 1838 until 1840 he was professor of languages at Ohio University. After that he served several congregations and in 1854 came to Indiana University as professor of mathematics. After filling this chair for two years, he was transferred to the chair of languages, Daniel Kirkwood of Newark, Delaware, having been chosen professor of mathematics. In 1863, Ballantine resigned his professorship in the University to accept a position as secretary of the American Board of Foreign Missions. Four years later he returned to Indiana University as professor of Greek. In 1878 he resigned his professorship, and after the resignation of Lemuel Moss in November, 1884, Ballantine was made acting president. When David Starr Jordan, professor of biology, was chosen president, Ballantine became vice president and professor of Greek. These positions he held until his death, March 31, 1886. Theophilus A. Wylie, Indiana University, Its History from 1820, when founded, to 1890 (Indianapolis, 1890), 119-121.
Proff. Kirkwood5 being unwell, Proff. Woodburn6 took his place. Assisted Mr. Given7 to carry a package of books from the depot. Got a Graeca Majora, Horace and Greek Lexicon. Read 40 lines in H.

Tuesday, January 5: Cloudy morning. Commenced to rain about ten. Attended college. Mr Robison of Rush co. came up in the evening and brought me the news from Fayettsville.8 Took Miss Lizzie to the exhibition of the Junior Class. Pretty good performance. Burlesque out on their program. Still raining.

Wednesday, January 6: Clear day. Got me a quietus.9 Received an invitation


  • 5 Daniel Kirkwood was born in Harford County, Maryland, September 27, 1814. In 1834 he attended an academy in York, Pennsylvania, and afterwards became a teacher there. Seven years later he was chosen principal of the high school, of which John W. Forney and Thaddeus Stevens were directors. In 1851, Kirkwood was chosen president of Delaware College, Newark, Delaware. Five years later he was elected professor of mathematics at Indiana University, which position he occupied until 1886, with the exception of about two years, during which he filled the chair of mathematics and astronomy in Jefferson College, Canons-burg, Pennsylvania. In 1886, Kirkwood resigned his professorship, having been connected with the University for nearly thirty years. In October, 1889, Professor and Mrs. Kirkwood (Sarah J. McNair of Newton, Pennsylvania), left for Riverside, California. Ibid., 122-123.
  • 6 James Woodburn was born in Chester District, South Carolina, September 11, 1817, and came to Bloomington with his father's family in 1826. He was educated at the common schools of the county. In 1840 he entered the junior class of the University, was graduated in 1842, and in 1845 received the A.M. degree. Immediately after graduation he engaged in teaching. In 1846, he married Martha Jane Hemphill. Seven years later under the presidency of Alfred Ryors, he was acting professor of mathematics and civil engineering, and in 1854 was called to fill the chair of adjunct professor of languages and principal of the preparatory department. For eleven years he faithfully discharged the duties of this position, acting sometimes as county surveyor, and often taking part in educational institutes. In 1865 he returned home sick, from an Institute he had been attending in Vincennes, and on September 8 died from the disease there contracted. He was a ruling elder in the Reformed Presbyterian church in Bloomington. Ibid., 119.
  • 7 Noah S. Given, born September 30, 1833, in Dearborn County, Indiana, was a resident of Lawrenceburg. After attending Franklin College for three years, he matriculated at Indiana University receiving the A.B., A.M. and LL.B. degrees. He was a representative in the state legislature in 1863 and 1873, and also senator in 1875. In 1878 he was elected judge of the seventh judicial district. For five years he served as county examiner and school trustee for the city of Lawrenceburg. He was married to Mary Martin. Ibid., 220.
  • 8 John C. Robinson, born February 29, 1840, in Rush County, Indiana, prepared for college in Fayetteville Academy. Fayetteville was located in the southwestern part of Fayette County—not to be confused with the present Fayetteville located in Lawrence County. Robinson was a district attorney in 1866, prosecuting attorney in 1868 and 1870, and elected a judge in 1876. Ibid., 229.
  • 9 Since the University needed money for new buildings, the Board of Trustees in April, 1854, had provided for personally owned scholarships or "quietuses." Anyone who paid one hundred dollars to the treasurer of the University received a certificate authorizing him to keep one student in the preparatory and academic departments perpetually and without paying tuition. The quietus was in use for about a quarter of a century. A detailed account of this system of scholarships may be found in James Albert Woodburn, History of Indiana University, (n.p., 1940), 224-245.
to a party at Mr Blair's on Bean Blossom Thursday night.10

Thursday, January 7: Clear day. Cool morning. Read thirty lines of Greek after dinner. About four, started in company with the rest to the party. Had a good time. Danced some. Was considerably amused at Mr Kayler,11 who cornered a lady on the table and seemed to have a happy time. Got home about 3. Studied some. Went to bed about 4.

Friday, January 8: Rose about seven o'clock. Felt a little the worse of the spree. Clear pleasant day. Went to college. Spent the most of the afternoon sleeping. Went to Society, which turned out pretty much of a bore.12 Six members joined. Got home about eleven.

Saturday, January 9: Rose tolerable early. Cloudy and raining a little. Went to college. Did not do anything. Mr Hamilton came on the ten o'clock train.13 Spent most of the afternoon running round town with him. Very muddy. Retired about ten.

Sunday, January 10: Rained all day. Went to meeting at Proff. Wylie's church.14 Went to the lecture at three o'clock. Turning cool and blowing a pretty strong gale. Read some. Broke the looking glass.

Monday, January 11: Cloudy and raining a little. Warm for the season. Went to college. Friend Robison came up to assist me in reading my Greek. Beam15 came in the evening. Bought a looking glass. Retired about half past ten.

Tuesday, January 12: Clear beautiful day. The freshman class had their lessons rather poor to day and had the pleasure of getting it over. Mr Hamilton came round in the evening. He talked of going home. Retired early.

Wednesday, January 13: Clear beautiful day. Went to chapel, where I heard John C. Wilson,16 one of the students was dead. On account of


  • 10 A mill stream, forty-five miles in length, rises in Brown County and runs westwardly through Monroe County emptying into the west fork of the White River near Gosport.
  • 11 Samuel J. Kahler, born January 20, 1834, in Center County, Pennsylvania, was a member of the graduating class of 1858. He was later a teacher and Methodist preacher and a member of the Kansas Legislature. Wylie, Indiana University, 221.
  • 12 Louden was a member of the Athenian Society. There were two literary societies at Indiana University while he was a student—The Philomathean Society and Athenian Society. Woodburn, Indiana University, 248.
  • 13 S. R. Hamilton was a Fayette County friend who appears frequently in the diary.
  • 14 Theophilus A. Wylie was born on October 8, 1810, in Philadelphia. He was the son of Samuel Brown Wylie and Margaret Watson Wylie. In 1830 he received the A.B. and A.M. degrees from the University of Pennsylvania, He became a student in the Theological Seminary of the Reformed Presbyterian church, and in 1836 was licensed to preach. In the same year he was offered a professorship of natural philosophy and chemistry. He left Philadelphia in the spring of 1837 and after a ten day journey reached Bloomington in April. In 1852 he accepted an invitation at Miami University, Oxford, Ohio, where he remained for two and one-half years. He was married to Rebecca Dennis of Germantown, Pennsylvania, November 5, 1838. Wylie, Indiana University, 106-107.
  • 15 David E. Beem, born on June 24, 1837, at Spencer, received the B.S. degree in 1858, A.B. in 1860, and A.M. in 1863. Ibid., 224.
  • 16 John C. Wilson, a freshman in 1858, was from Sullivan, Indiana.
this college was dismissed for today. Mr Hamilton came up in the afternoon and told me he was going home. Went to the funeral. Mr. Hamilton missed the train and by that means stayed all night with me.

Thursday, January 14: Rose early. Mr Hamilton took the freight at seven. Went to college. Proff. Kirkwood was able to be at recitations. Very pleasant day. Bought me a Legender for 2.15.17 Wrote a composition.

Friday, January 15: Cloudy and raining. Rose pretty early. Went to college. Got my language lesson out in the afternoon. Went to Society. Read a composition. Got home about twelve. Got apples.

Saturday, January 16: Cloudy. Snowed a little last evening. Declaimed. Finished reading Hume Sec. Vol. of England. Pretty cool. Retired about half past ten.

Sunday, January 17: Clear, pleasant day. Went to Proff. Wylie's church. Went to college lecture. The Dr. commencing a series of Lectures on the hero, David. In the evening took Miss Lizzie to the 1st Presbyterian church, where I heared a sermon an hour and a half long by Fisk of Greencastle.18

Monday, January 18: Clear and very fine day. Went to college. Read thirty lines in Greek. Read some in Humes history of England. The weather is extremely fine for the season.

Tuesday, January 19: Clear pleasant day. Rose early. Went to college as usual. Helped to drive some cattle to town.19 Read forty lines in Horace. Went over to Proff. Woodburns in the evening and had a pleasant time.

Wednesday, January 20: Rose tolerable early. Went to college and recited as usual. The weather is extremely fine for the season. It reminds us of the middle of April. People are becoming alarmed for fear they will have no ice for next summer.20

Thursday, January 21: Clear pleasant day. About warm enough to give a person the spring fever. Suffered considerable from the headache, and a little bile that is collecting on the point of my shoulder. Went to bed pretty early.

Friday, January 22: Clear pleasant day. Went to college. Came home. Had a very bad headache. Did not study much. In the evening, went


  • 17 Legendre was the author of the standard text in The Elements of Geometry and Trigonometry after 1830. A copy of the book is in the Wylie Collection at Indiana University.
  • 18 Ezra W. Fisk was born in Wilmington, Windham County, Vermont, May 29, 1820. About 1854 he accepted the pastorate of the Presbyterian church at Greencastle. This position he resigned in 1872 for the presidency of the Female College of Indiana, which was located at Greencastle. A Biographical History of Eminent and Self-Made Men of the State of Indiana (2 vols., Cincinnati, Ohio, 1880), I, District 5, pp. 11-12.
  • 19 Not only were cattle driven to Bloomington for sale but most families maintained a cow. During the day, these animals grazed in Dunn's woods and other nearby pastures. Boys and college students earned small sums for driving them out in the morning and returning them to their various owners in the evening.
  • 20 Ice ponds were numerous in or near Bloomington. The ice cut in the winter was stored in sawdust for use in warmer weather.
with Mr. Elliott21 out to Mr McKinly's, where we found good company of Ladies.

Saturday, January 23: Clear pleasant day. Quite warm. Took Miss Lizzie down to public performances at the chapel. Spent the rest of the day in reading in Hume's history of England. Retired early.

Sunday, January 24: Rained all day. Went to Proff. Wylies church. Did not go to the Lecture, on account of a "pet" I had on my shoulder. Did not go out at night.

Monday, January 25: Still raining. Went down to chapel but an account of the aforsaid "pet" did not stay for recitations. Got my latin lesson. Read some in Hume. Commenced the study of Geometry.

Tuesday, January 26: Clear day. Went to college. Recited as usual. Studied some in the afternoon. In the evening went to a singing at Proff. Woodburn. Had a glorious time. Took Miss Lu home.22 Got home and went to bed about 2 ocl.

Wednesday, January 27: Clear pleasant day. Attended college. Nothing of importance transpired till evening, when my chum & myself went down to old Uncys and got a dish of oysters.23 After a hard seige I succeeded in eating mine, but my chum left his.

Thursday, January 28: Cloudy and raining. Commenced snowing about nine. Attended college. Studied some in the afternoon. The first winter day of the season. Snowed considerable. Old winter is not going to be cheated out of his rights.

Friday, January 29: Cloudy day. Attended college. Recited as usual. Studied some in the afternoon. My Friend, J. C. E. got a little worsted during the evening.24 Went to Society. Had a pretty good time. Got home about twelve. Got something to eat

Saturday, January 30: Cloudy day. Went to chapel. Got a book out of the library. Did not perform. Read in Hume's history. My chum & myself went down to town in the evening.

Sunday, January 31: Clear day. Went to Proff. Wylie's church to meeting. At three o'clock took Miss Lizzie to chapel. Took a walk with my chum. Took Miss Lu to Methodist church. Took her home and spent a few minuits with her.

Monday, February 1: Snowing. Never waked up till the boys were shouting at me that the second bell had rung. Went to college and recited as usual. Snowed all day, it looks like old winter is not going to be cheated out of her rights. Retired early.

Tuesday, February 2: Clear. Pretty cool morning. Went through the


  • 21 James C. Elliott, born January 6, 1830, in Sparta, Illinois, received the A.B. and A.M. degrees from Indiana University. He was pastor of the United Presbyterian church in Wyoming, Wisconsin, from 1863 to 1868. From 1865 to 1868 he was a member of the board of directors of the United Presbyterian Theological Seminary at Monmouth, Illinois, and from 1871 to 1876 a member of the board of Monmouth College, Wylie, Indiana, University, 224-225.
  • 22 Probably Louise Wylie Boisen.
  • 23 Uncle Sid Pullen, whose daughter was the mother of Jim Hooper and Fanny Hooper Turner, had a shop, stocked with good things to eat, on College Avenue near Fourth Street in Bloomington.
  • 24 The initials seem to be those of James C. Elliott.
regular routine of business without any relief from head-ache or heart-ache.

Wednesday, February 3: Rose pretty early. Clear pleasant day overhead. The ground is not sufficiently froze for running slays. My chum and me went out on a spree. Had a good time with Lizzie & Mat.25 Got home about 1 o'clock. Found we were bolted out. The old Lady came and open the door.

Thursday, February 4: My chum & myself feeling more like indulging in the slumbers of Morpheus, than pertaking of the luxury of the breakfast table, did not get up for that meal, although the old lady came to the door and called to us. Went to college.

Friday, February 5: Rose tolerable early. Stopped as I went to college and left a watch, that I broke the crystal out of last Thursday night for Miss Mat. to get one in. Finished reading the 3d vol. of Humes History. Went to Society. Had a good time.

Saturday, February 6: Rose tolerable early for Saturday morning. Went to college. Declaimed under N. S. Given, in Proff. Stones department.26 Stopped a few minuits at Proff. Woodburns, and returned Miss Mattie watch. Spent the evening in social conversation. Snowed all day.

Sunday, February 7: Cloudy day. Tolerable pleasant. Went to Proff. Wylie's Church. After dinner went to chapel with friend Elliott. In the evening took Miss Lizzie to Methodist meeting. Received an invitation to attend the Anniversary of the Neotrophian Society on Thursday night.27

Monday, February 8: Rose early. Went to college Pleasant day. The snow about all disappeared. In the evening went to see Miss Lu. Got an invitation to a party there tomorrow night. Got home about eleven. Went to bed immediately.

Tuesday, February 9: Cloudy. Commenced to rain about eight. Went to college. In the evening went over to Proff. Woodburns to take Miss Lizzie to the party. Went with Miss Mattie & Lizzie around to Mr Fosters for Miss McCaully. Had a tolerable good time at the party.

Wednesday, February 10: Cold morning. Froze up solid. Wind blowing and freezing equal to a frog pond in the Arctic Regions. Went to college. In the evening went with Mr Goven to Proff. Woodburns, to see the girls.

Thursday, February 11: Clear part of the day. Pretty cool. Went to college. In the evening went to the Academy to hear the Anniversary


  • 25 Probably Miss Mattie R. Cherry who was a student in the Monroe Female Seminary and a member of the Neotrophian Society. Woodburn, Indiana University, 131.
  • 26 Wilbur F. Stone, born December 28, 1832, in Litchfield, Connecticut, was a tutor in 1857-1858. He received the A.B., A.M., and LL.D. degrees from Indiana University. Ibid., 260; Wylie, Indiana University, 218.
  • 27 The Neotrophian Society was an organization of the Monroe Female Seminary. Mrs. E. J. McFerson, a sister of Daniel Read, who was professor of ancient languages, was the principal of the seminary. Ibid., 115. It occupied a building at the northeast corner of Seventh and College Avenue.
of the Neotrophian Society. It was very good. Spoken by Miss Perring. Then took Miss Lizzie to the N.S. Church to hear a T[emperance] lecture by Miss Filkins.

Friday, February 12: Cloudy and cool day. Went to college. Received an invitation to a party at Mr Alexanders to night. Mr Lemon, Mr Miller & Dodd came up and spent the evening. Took Miss Lizzie to Anniversary of the Athenian S. After it was over went to the party. Took Miss Lizzie home about eleven.

Saturday, February 13: Heavy fall of snow last night. Went to college. Stayed for Moot Court. Snowed all day. Sleighs running. In the evening took Miss Lizzie to the Methodist church to hear a lecture on the "Plurality of Worlds," by Proff. Hibben of Greencastle.28 Had a good time with Lizzie & Mattie after going home.

Sunday, February 14: Clear day. Went to Proff. Wylie's church. Went to Chapel lecture, which was delivered by Dr Beck of Centerville, Ind. Took a walk round the square with Calvin. Did not attend church. Retired early. Thawing considerable.

Monday, February 15: Snow about to leave. Went to college. Got a lot of valentines. Did not study very hard. Went up to town in the evening to the post office. The valentine[s] pouring in like water out of a coffee pot.

Tuesday, February 16: Clear day. Went to college as usual. Went to the post office after dinner and walked around the square with Miss Lu. Got out my latin and wrote a letter for Dowa.

Wednesday, February 17: Cool, clear morning. Went to college. Coming home at eleven met with my old teacher Reve R. B. Abbott. He was going to remain but a few days. Went out to play ball, but a disagreement arising, we throwed up. Retired early.

Thursday, February 18: Cloudy, cool day. Went to college. Did not play any after dinner on account of our fuss. In the evening, called in at Proff. Woodburns and had a big time with Lizzie and Mattie. Got home about ten o'clock. Raining and freezing. Very slick, by golly Lizzie is some.

Friday, February 19: Cloudy. Snowed some last night. Went to college. Snowed during the afternoon. Started to Society, when got as far as Proff. W. Lizzie & Mattie being out sliding on their chairs, they give me an invitation to take a ride, which I did. after this Lizzie pitched into Snow balling me and I had to give up. Got home about 1 o'c.

Saturday, February 20: Cloudy. Went to college. Declaimed under Mr Blount.29 Got a vol. of Moore's Poems. Read some in Humes History. Went down to town and spent an hour. In the evening I was called


  • 28 Probably Henry B. Hibben who taught in Indiana high schools and academies and for two years was an itinerant Methodist minister. For five years he held a professorship in Asbury (DePauw University). In 1860 he was elected to fill the chair of English literature at Indiana University. The following year he resigned his professorship to become a chaplain in the army. In 1864, President Lincoln appointed him a chaplain in the navy, which position he held for more than twenty years. Woodburn, Indiana University, 267.
  • 29 Brazillai M. Blount of West Kinderhook, New York, was a junior in 1858. Wylie, Indiana University, 386.
on to assist an old drunkerd, who had lay down in the fence corner. It was a most detestable sight. Returned about eleven.

Sunday, February 21: Cool morning. Went to Proff. Wylie's church. Snowed till about two o'clock, which makes it very good slaying. Went chapel lecture. Very few out. In the evening went to camelite meeting.30 Where there was two dipped.

Monday, February 22: Very cold morning. Went to college. Recited in languages, the Proff. of Mathematics being absent, we were excused from that. Got out my lessons & read about seventy five pages of Hume. Did not feel very lively. Went to town after some gas.31 Retired about ten.

Tuesday, February 23: Clear day. Snow melted considerable. Went to college. Did not study very hard. Read about one hundred pages of Hume. Retired early.

Wednesday, February 24: Rose early. Clear day. Went to college. After dinner went to Mr. Robison's room to get my latin lesson. Got back in time for supper. Wrote a letter to Howe of Cincinnati. Retired about ten.

Thursday, February 25: Clear day. Rose early. On account of it being Thanksgiving day, did not go to college. Went to Proff. Wylie's church. In the afternoon went to prayer meeting in the college. After night took Miss Lizzie & Mattie to church. Stayed with them till twelve.

Friday, February 26: Clear day. Went to college. The Freshman class, made quite a fine appearance. There was only about six regulars present, and about a dozen of scientifics. Went to Society. Got home about one o. Finished the fourth vol. of Humes history.

Saturday, February 27: Clear day. Very warm. Went to chapel prayers. Did not stay to perform. Felt rather mean for doing any thing. Went up to town and spent some time. Read some in Hume. Retired early.

Sunday, February 28: Cloudy. Snowed some last night. Went to Proff. W. church. Went to the college lecture. In the evening went to the Camelite church with Miss Lizzie. Stayed with her a few min. after came home and read an outrageous valentine.

Monday, March 1: Cloudy and pretty cold. Went to college. Commenced to review for examination. Mr Blair called in after dinner. Did not feel very well. Went to bed early.

Tuesday, March 2: Clear cold day. Went to college. Did not receite in languages, the Proff. being absent on account of sickness in his


  • 30 Alexander Campbell, one of the founders of the Disciples of Christ, was born in county Antrim, Ireland, on September 12, 1788. In 1809 the family came to America. Thirty-one years later he founded Bethany College in the present West Virginia and became its president. The followers of Campbell were referred to as Campbellites. The latter part of 1850 while the Indiana state constitutional convention was in session he visited Indianapolis and the governor and the members of the convention attended Campbell's meeting. On this trip he also visited his old friend Andrew Wylie in Bloomington. Robert Richardson, Memoirs of Alexander Campbell (Cincinnati, Ohio, 1897), I, 19, 205, II, 485, 589.
  • 31 Gossip or light conversation!!
family. Mr Wilson32 called in to see a feller, and also Mr McNeal.33 Committed some devilment and then went to bed, about twelve.

Wednesday, March 3: Clear day. Went to college. The Freshman class was well represented today, and all read very well. Going down in the morning seen a lady, slam a celler door to and run. Wonder why? Bead sixty lines in Greek. Retired early.

Thursday, March 4: Rose pretty early. Went to college. Got home at eleven as usual. Read one hundred lines in latin. Had a slight pain in one of my teeth, and wasn't very well other ways.

Friday, March 5: Clear beautiful day. Did not go to college, on account of having a very severe head-acke, and also a bad cold. Went up to town in the afternoon and looked around. Did not go to Society. Retired about ten.

Saturday, March 6: Snowing. Soon dried it up. Went to college. Public day.34 Some very good speeches. Stayed for Moot Court.35 A large criminal case on the docket. After dinner, went to Moot Court again, and took Miss Lizzie. Did the same after supper. Five pretty speeches made. Got home about eleven.

Sunday, March 7: Cloudy and chilly day. Did not go to church. Went to chapel. Spent the day, one way and another, but not very well I am afraid. Did not go to church at night. Did not feel well, and was very sick part of the day.

Monday, March 8: Clear day. Pretty cool. Went to college. But in the first place an old Lady that stayed all night, hollowed us up. Was very unwell. Studied some, but not a great deal. Went to the post office. My friend, Elliott got a "whopper." Retired early.

Tuesday, March 9: Clear pleasant day. Went to college. Did not study very hard. In the evening went and took Miss Lizzie to the Anniversary of the Caliopean Society. Very good addres on the "Prose and Poetry of Life." Heard Dr. Murphy struck Dr. Dailey.36


  • 32 Probably John H. Wilson who graduated in 1860. After graduation he taught Latin, mathematics, and Greek at Monmouth College. Wylie, Indiana University, 226.
  • 33 Probably Harrison McNeil from Indianola, Iowa, also a member of the class of 1860. Ibid., 225.
  • 34 Students were required to prepare orations, essays, and declamations which were given as class exercises on Saturday mornings. Every third Saturday there was a "Public" in the College chapel. From eight to ten performers appeared on the two-hour program. The faculty and students were required to attend and anybody else who wished might come. Woodburn, Indiana University, 140-141.
  • 35 A moot court was held in the school of law in which the students of both classes were exercised in the preparation of pleadings, rules of practice, forms of record entries, and discussion of legal questions. At first the court was held every Saturday. Samuel B. Harding, Indiana University, 1820-1904. (Bloomington, 1904), 168-169.
  • 36 William M. Daily, a native of Ohio, was elected to the Board of Trustees of Indiana University on February 10, 1853, and in August of the same year became president of the University. In July, 1858, A. M. Murphy, a doctor of Bloomington, filed charges against Daily. The latter was accused of being incompetent, of being no disciplinarian, of misquoting the formula used in conferring degrees, of not paying his debts, and of plagiarism. None of the charges were sustained. Ivy L. Chamness and Burton D. Myers (eds.), Trustees and Officers of Indiana University, 1820 to 1950 (n.p., 1951), 445-460, 327.

Wednesday, March 10: Clear and very fine day. Went to college. Had a pretty good recitation all through. Commenced reviewing Geometry. Several ladies called in. Was invited to a party here to morrow night. Retired early.

Thursday, March 11: Clear pleasant day. Went to college. Heard the Senior Class was about to bust. Went and brought Miss Lizzie to the party. Had an introduction to several fine ladies. Among whom was Miss Gamble. Took Miss Lizzie home. Retired about two.

Friday, March 12: Clear fine day. Went to college. Felt pretty sleepy. After dinner went up to town. Coming back stopped at Proff. W. Had some fun. Went with Miss Lizzie over to Mr Blair's. Very pleasant strolling over the fields. Went to society. Got home.

Saturday, March 13: Clear warm day. Very well calculated to give a person the spring fever. Went to college. Read a composition. Did not study any. Felt pretty dizzy. Friends, Edgar, Hood, Given Barton called in." Went up to town to auction.

Sunday, March 14: Very warm sultry day. Threatens rain. Went to Proff. church. Took Miss Lizzie down to chapel. The Dr. give us a very good one on the scences of life. Took Miss Lizzie to the O.S. Presbyterian church where Mr. Shaw a prorenata preached.38 Stayed with her eleven.

Monday, March 15: Rose pretty early. Raining. Went to college. Cleared off about ten. Studied some. Very warm, calculated to give a person the spring fever. The Senior Class have a party to night, given Dr. Dailey. Retired early.

Tuesday, March 16: Cloudy and very warm. Went to college. Bid friend Given good-bye, as he was going home. Bored a little over the latin, during the afternoon. In the evening called in at Proff. and spent an hour very pleasantly with Miss Lizzie.

Wednesday, March 17: Cloudy and raining. Did not go to college. Couple of ladies called in to our room to see us. Spent the day in talking, studying, reading, writing, eating eggs, and playing—Walked to the post office. Rained some during the day.

Thursday, March 18: Clear warm day. Went to college and recited in mathematics. Studied some during the afternoon. In the evening took Miss Lizzie to a concert in the college chapel. Pretty good performance.—the ladies looked charming.


  • 37 Robert S. Edgar, a resident of Coultersville, Illinois, graduated from Indiana University in 1861; John Hood, a native of Washington County, Illinois, was a member of the class of 1862; probably Noah S. Given, a native of Dearborn County, who was graduated in 1859; probably Philip H. Barton from Washington, Indiana, who was a sophomore in 1859. Wylie, Indiana University, 220, 227, 231, 384.
  • 38 Prorenta, a name for the Old Side or Old Style Covenanters. "The thing as born or originally established." The Old Style and New Style Presbyterian branches finally joined again in 1869 after a lapse of thirty-two years. The Union Church was at Ninth and College Avenues. "The Old Side branch, the original Old Covenanters, the early church of our fathers, opposed to all change of faith, or innovation in custom, … have maintained until now a successful separate existence, and constitute to-day Mr. Shaw's prosperous congregation." Semi-Centennial Anniversary of the United Presbyterian Congregation of Bloomington, Indiana, 42.

Friday, March 19: Warm and sultry. Went to college. Did not recite the first hour on account of a fellow being there with a perpetual almanac, which he explained for an hour. Bought one. Wrote a compos[ition]. Went to society. Read a compos[ition]. Received an invitation to a party, at Mr Crabs on Monday night.

Saturday, March 20: Cloudy. Rained greater part of the day. Went to college. Declaimed. Mr McNeal and Mr Doods called in.39 In the afternoon went to Macs room. Mr Edgar & Hood called up to see us. In the evening went over and spent an hour very pleasantly with my "duck". Raining still.

Sunday, March 21: Clear cool day. Went to church at Proff. Wylie's. Went to college chapel. Heard a very good lecture. In the evening, took Miss Lizzie to the Methodist Church. Stayed with her a few minuits after we came home. Retired about 11.

Monday, March 22: Cloudy and chilly. Went to college. After dinner went to the livery stable to hire a buss but could not get one.40 In the evening took Miss Lizzie out to a party at Mr Crabs. Had a big time going out, crossing fences, and branches, and wading through brush and briers. And a little worse coming home. Retired about two.

Tuesday, March 23: Clear pleasant day. Went to college. Felt rather dull after the ramble last night. Slep some during the afternoon. In the evening took Miss Lizzie down to chapel to hear the speeches of the graduates in the Law department.41 There we[re] eight very good speeches. Got home about eleven.

Wednesday, March 24: Clear pleasant day. Went to college. Nothing new except that some of the students were taken up for making a fuss the evening before in the chapel. In the evening took Miss Lizzie down to chapel to hear the address delivered to the law students by Judge Bryant.42 Very good thing.

Thursday, March 25: Clear pleasant morning. Went to college. Did not feel very well. Studied some. In the evening, took Miss Lizzie to the


  • 39 Probably Samuel W. Dodds, a native of Corydon, Indiana, was a member of the class of 1861. Wylie, Indiana University, 227.
  • 40 Omnibuses for picnics and parties were for hire in Bloomington. They were able to seat a dozen or so and were drawn by two horses.
  • 41 The eight graduates of the law department were Newton Burwell of Bluffton, later a Methodist preacher and member of the state legislature; Stephen Girard Burton of Lebanon, Kentucky, a politician and minister, member of the Indiana Legislature for two terms; Benjamin F. Cavins of New Albany, lawyer and Baptist minister, served in the Civil War; Andrew Jackson Lee of Starville, Texas; Eli K. Millen of Bloomington, served as prosecuting attorney of Monroe County immediately after leaving college; Hosea Murray of Springhill; Wilbur Fiske Stone of Denver, Colorado; and James B. Turner of Elizabeth town, Illinois. Ibid., 216, 218, 328-329.
  • 42 Probably James Ray McCorkle Bryant who was born at Philadelphia on June 25, 1802. In 1823 he married Dorcas G. Ellis, daughter of Robert Ellis of the treasury department, Washington, D.C. Bryant was a member of the Indiana constitutional convention in 1850-1851. In 1855 he was appointed as a trustee of Indiana University for a four-year term. From 1857 to 1859 he served as a trustee and professor of law at Indiana University. Myers, Trustees and Officers of Indiana University, 210-212.
Monroe F. Academy to see some experiments in chemistry. Got home about eleven.

Friday, March 26: Clear and very warm. Went to college and recited in Mathematics. Studied some in the afternoon. Received a check on the Bank. Went to society in the evening, where we suspended Mr. Dobsin." Came home early, on account of going to be examined to morrow in mathematics.

Saturday, March 27: Clear morning. Rained a little about noon. Went to chapel prayers. Ramsey Huston called in to see me after dinner.

Sunday, March 28: Clear day. Went down to town to tell the Dr to come and see my chum. Went to Proff. Wylie's Church. Took Miss Lizzie down to chape [1]. Heard a lecture on Home. In the evening took Miss Lizzie to the O.S. church to hear Mr Fisk preach. Very good sermon of an hours length.

Monday, March 29: Clear pleasant day. Did not feel very well. Went to chapel. Packed up my books. Went with friend Elliott to the woods to hear him speak his speech.44 In the evening took Miss Lizzie to the exhibition of the Athenian Society. Very good performance.

Tuesday, March 30: Very pleasant day. Went to chapel. Alexander45 & Edgar came to my room. Was examined in languages in the afternoon. Got off pretty easy. Took Miss Lizzie to the exhibition of the Philo Society. Stayed with her till about half after one.

Wednesday, March 31: Clear pleasant day. Went to chapel. Went with friend Elliott out to Mr McKinleys. Had a fine time with the gals. Friend Cooper helped me to carry my trunk to the depot. Went around and bid Miss Lizzie Goodbye. Hated to leave her.

Thursday, April 1: Got to Indianapolis at 1 o'clock last night. Raining this morning. Stayed at the Little Hotel. Left at one for Cambridge city. Arrived at four. Stayed there till eight, and then put out on the bus for Connersville. Got there at eleven, and put up at the Scofield House.

Friday, April 2: Cloudy. After eating some breakfast went out into town to see what I could see. Met several old friends. Father came in for me. Seen my old "chum" S. R. Hamilton. Started for home about four. Roads pretty bad. Got there at seven. Seen Ag. All well.

Saturday, April 3: Clear warm day. Helped to haul some wood in the forenoon. Pam and Maria come in the evening, "all look as large as life and twice as natural."

Sunday, April 4: Clear pleasant day. Went to Church in the bus. Heard


  • 43 There were three boys named Dobson enrolled in 1858, David M., Benjamin F., and Joseph L., all from Spencer. None of them graduated. Wylie, Indiana University, 400.
  • 44 The use of Dunn's Woods, later to be the campus of the University, and other outlying forest areas were often the scene of practice oratory.
  • 45 John D. Alexander, born February 6, 1839, in Bloomington, Indiana, was a member of the class of 1861. In 1862 he entered the army and served three years. Eighteen years later he was elected a ruling elder in the Cumberland Presbyterian church. On December 8, 1886 he was married to Mary M. Rogers. Ibid., 226-227.
two long sermons by Dr. Heron. Seen several of my old playmates. Spoke to Miss—-. Felt pretty lonesome in the evening. Wrote a letter to my "duck" that I left behind me.

Monday, April 5: Clear pleasant day. Rolled logs and piled chunks most of the day. In the evening went to see Miss Emmy.48 Had a big time with her in general and a glorious time in particular. Squeezed her till twelve.

Tuesday, April 6: Clear day. Commenced plowing. In the evening went to Vienna.47 Seen Miss Gray.

Wednesday, April 7: Cloudy and pretty cool. Plowed all day. Rained some in the evening.

Thursday, April 8: Cloudy and raining a little. Plowed. Old Jonathan Davis called in at noon, and endeavored to enlighten me a little on my physical and mental abilities. He is an incessant bore. Rained from noon till sundown.

Friday, April 9: Clear morning. Plowed all day. Went to Vienna in the evening. Got a letter from my "chum" E. C. Cooper. Also received one the same evening from Mr. Elliott.

Saturday, April 10: Cloudy. Rained a little, during the day. Did not do much of any thing in particular.

Sunday, April 11: Raining. Did not go to Church. Kindled a fire in my room and sit there all day, with the blines down, and the shutters closed. Felt pretty lonesome, when I would think of the pleasant Sundays I had spent in company with Lizzie. Smoked cigars to put in the time.

Monday, April 12: Warm and sultry. Hauled some hay. Went to old Mr Littles after some corn. Got my dinner. Had a pretty good time with the old man. Rained. From present appearance, it looks like a very early spring. Went to Milligans found them minus.

Tuesday, April 13: Warm and cloudy. Went to Mr Nashes to a barn raising. Got home about two. Went down to James Miller's, and staid all night. Roads in an awful bad condition. Found the folks all able to navigate.

Wednesday, April 14: Cloudy. A degree or two cooler than the preceding. Got home about noon. Rained some. Built some fence. Tom Marks came along and talked an hour or two. And so and so.

Thursday, April 15: Slightly cloudy. This day was appointed as a fast day by a revival convention. Did not go to Church. Read some latin. Read some in the life of Luther. Got a letter from my "chum."

Friday, April 16: Cloudy and warm. Rode out in search of some hogs that had left. This seems to be a very early Spring. Grass, wheat and every thing else very forward. The peach trees have been in bloom for a week or two. Got a letter from my "duck."

Saturday, April 17: Cloudy and damp. Plowed most of the day.

Sunday, April 18: Cloudy and raining. Went to Church in the buggy. Put in a pretty hard day writing notes with Mr Nisbet. Roads very


  • 46 It is possible that Miss Emmy never met Miss Lizzie.
  • 47 Vienna was a small town in Rush County, east of Rushville. This little village is not to be confused with the present town by the same name in Scott County.
muddy. Come near sticking several times. Sacrament next Sabbeth.

Monday, April 19: Cloudy. Pruned some apple trees. Every thing is growing very rapid but the ground is so wet the farmers can't do any thing.

Tuesday, April 20: Cloudy and showered all day. Went to Connersville, and spent most of the day. Got a pair of pants cut. Got caught in a shower of rain coming home. Stopped in Benedicts Stable.

Wednesday, April 21: Clear and very pleasant. Went over to Ag. And packed her young one over here. In the evening took a ride around creation in search of some cows. Got a letter from my "chum". Took the big Jaw.

Thursday, April 22: Clear and warm. My Jaw swelled up pretty bad-Plowed most of the day. Did not feel very well. Rained and blowed some in the evening.

Friday, April 23: Pretty cool. Wind blowing. This was kept as a fast day previous to the sacrament. Did not go to church. Read some in various authors.

Saturday, April 24: Clear and cool. Went to meeting. Heard a sermon preached by Dr. Wilson of Cincinnati.

Sunday, April 25: Cold morning. Snowed some last night. Went to church. Went to the sacrament table. Services were tolerably protracted.

Monday, April 26: Cloudy and cool. Went to church. After meeting was over talked awhile to the ladies. In the evening went to Ag. Met with R. Blueston. Went to see Em. had a pretty good time. Eat some ginger bread and left.

Tuesday, April 27: Clear cool day. Raked some stalks till noon. Plowed in the afternoon.

Wednesday, April 28: Plowed all day. Very pleasant weather. Studied some.

Thursday, April 29: Plowed all day very hard. At noon read sixteen lines of latin. Got out one proposition in geometry. Read some in Walter Scott

Friday, April 30: A few clouds dot the horizon. Did not feel very well. Rained some in the evening.

Saturday, May 1: Plowed part of the day, and part of it, it rained. In the evening went to Connersville. Received a letter from Dr Daily. Very muddy. Did not get home till late.

Sunday, May 2: Pretty nice day. A few clouds flying. Dr Heron did not preach, and I stayed at home. Read some in different books, and spent the day various ways. Rained some in the evening.

Monday, May 3: Cloudy and rained some. Plowed. Read a few latin odes in Horace. Finished Scotts "Lady of the Lake," which is a nice tale. Read his "Don Roderick" which is also pretty good.

Tuesday, May 4: Cloudy. Rained very heavy last night. Rained once and awhile as occasion permitted. Read some Greek.

Wednesday, May 5: Cloudy and a little cooler. Read some latin. Rained some.

Thursday, May 6: Cloudy and cool. Built some fence. Read some latin and studied a little at Geometry. Worked some in the garden, planting beats.

Friday, May 7: Clear warm day. All went to Connersville except myself. Started to Vienna in the afternoon and the horse scaring with me. And the saddle breaking I found myself in the mud. I felt like pronouncing the curse upon the horse, that Horace did on the tree.

Saturday, May 8: Clear warm day. Plowed. Nothing of importance occurred. I did not feel as well as might. I have not completely got over my horse throw.

Sunday, May 9: Cloudy, but pleasant day. Did not go to church. S. R. Hamilton came in the evening to stay all night. Had quite an interesting conversation with him on different topics. Took a walk and smoked a cigar.

Monday, May 10: Raining and very chilly. Rained all day. Mr Hamilton stayed till after dinner. Wrote two or three letters, and put in the evening one way or another.

Tuesday, May 11: Still raining. Very dull and gloomy weather. Had the horrors all day, and felt very lonesome. Studied out four or five propositions in Geometry. Retired pretty early.

Wednesday, May 12: Clear pleasant day. Built fence. Scarcely any corn planted yet, on account of the wetness of the season. Wheat and grass are very forward, but corn will evidently be late.

Thursday, May 13: Clear and warm. Plowed all day. Threatened rain in the evening. Did not feel very well, hence did not read or study much,—retired pretty early.

Friday, May 14: Cloudy. Thundered, lightened and rained very hard last night. Read some in Walter Scotts "Lay of the Last Minstrel." Went up to Vienna. Towards evening there came up a very hard thunder gust with wind and rain. Blowed all the fences down.

Saturday, May 15: Cloudy and warm. Built the fences up that the storm throwed down. Rained a little in the evening. Wrote some items. This has been a very wet, dismal week. Scarcely any corn planted yet.

Sunday, May 16: Raining. Blowed off about ten. Went to Church. Heard two long sermons by Dr. Heron. Roads very bad.

Monday, May 17: Clear and warm. Planted some Water-melons. Built some fence. After dinner it rained pretty much all evening.

Tuesday, May 18: Clear day. Went to Connersville. Got home about 2 ocl. Bought a copy of Pope's Works. Built some fence.

Wednesday, May 19: Clear day. Sawed up a old walnut the wind had blowed down.

Thursday, May 20: Went and worked on the roads all day.48 Pretty cool all day. Rained some last night.

Friday, May 21: Clear warm day worked on the roads to day again. Charley Washam supervisor. Plowed a while in the evening.

Saturday, May 22: Clear day. Plowed. The Misses Harris came over in the afternoon. Had a pretty large time with them.

Sunday, May 23: Cloudy—rained some last night. Went to Prorenata


  • 48 It was the duty of the road supervisor to order out every person in his district to work on roads and highways two days between the fifteenth day of May and the first day of July annually. Laws of Indiana, 1839-1840, pp. 10-11.
meeting. Heard a long sermon by Dodds. At intermission went down to James Hillers. Got my dinner, and stayed till night. Got home about sundown. Threatens rain.

Monday, May 24: Cloudy. Commenced furrine out ground to plant. Came on rain about nine. Rained the rest of the day. Read some latin. Read some in Pope, and some in Rollin. Retired early.

Tuesday, May 25: Raining. Cleared off about noon. Read some latin. Wrote some. Read Pope's Essay on Man. Very wet time. Wrote a letter or two. Retired about eleven.

Wednesday, May 26: Cloudy. Pretty cool day. Done some little turns about the house. Set out some cabbage plants. Read some latin. Read some in Rollin.

Thursday, May 27: Clear and warm. Split a few rails. Mr Miller & Mr R. S. Hamilton coming in the middle of the forenoon. I quit. We all went out squirl hunting. Mrs. Harris and Maria were also here. They all stayed over night.

Friday, May 28: Clear. After the folks had left went to furring out. Planted some in the afternoon. Pretty wet. Rained some about dusk. Got very sick about bed time.

Saturday, May 29: Cloudy. Rained right smart last night. Had a very bad head acke. Did not do anything except hunt a little in the evening. Very warm.

Sunday, May 30: Cloudy most of the day. Stayed at home as I was not very well. Read some in the Life of Luther, and some other works. Thundered most of the day but did not rain.

Monday, May 81: Cloudy. Rained some last night. Went out to plow, but coming on rain and I quit. Hauled some logs. Read some in different things. Plowed some after supper. Was not very well. Retired early.

Tuesday, June 1: Clear and very pleasant day. Crossed out ground till noon. Plowed in the afternoon. This is the first day of June, and there is scarcely any corn planted. Last month was aperpetual rain all the time.

Wednesday, June 2: Threatened rain. Covered corn with the hop-jack48 till the middle of the afternoon, when it commenced raining. Did not rain very heavy.

Thursday, June 3: Cloudy morning. Rained last night. Plowed all day. Very warm. Nothing of interest transpired. Every body wanting there corn planted, but can't get it for the wet weather.

Friday, June 4: Clear morning. Very warm. Covered corn till noon. Went out to plow, but it came on rain. In the evening went out hunting. Went up to Vienna.

Saturday, June 5: Went out hunting a while this morning. Finished breaking up by noon. Rained all the afternoon. Read some latin. Read some in Macauley's History of England.

Sunday, June 6: Rained all last night. Pretty large fresh. Cleared off. Stayed at home all day. Read some in the Life of Luther.


  • 49 Probably a local term applied to a plow so arranged as to avoid roots and stones.

Monday, June 7: Clear day. Pretty warm. Went out hunting in the forenoon. Afternoon, went to Connersville to hear Sam Parker50 make a speech on the Junction Rail-road. Sammy a pretty fluent speaker, but he has some wild screems and odd gestures.

Tuesday, June 8: Clear. Exceedingly warm day. Cross off ground.

Wednesday, June 8: Clear morning, but cloudy during the afternoon. Planted corn. Commenced raining about dark. Nothing of any importance going on in the neighborhood.

Thursday, June 10: Cloudy and warm. Finished planting, all except the orchard, by noon. Broke up the orchard. Commenced raining about 4 P.M. Read some in Maccauly History of England. Retired early.

Friday, June 11: Raining. Continued to do so all day. Read some latin. Read some in Macaulay's. Went to Vienna. The creek so high the mail could not get out. An Exhibition out at Fairview.51

Saturday, June 12: Cloudy and misty. Replanted corn. Rained some at noon. Jim Nisbet called a while. Read some in Macaulays. Some in Rollin. Retired about eleven pretty sleepy.

Sunday, June 13: Clear and very pleasant day. Went to church. Heard a sermon by Dr Heron, and one by his Son John Heron. Sunday school was opened to continue during the summer. Retired early.

Monday, June 14: Clear and pleasant day. Heard that my old friend Tom Milligan52 was going to get married on the 17 inst to Miss Isabelle Gamble of Bloomington. We wish them a whole hat full of Joy. Tom is a whole souled fellow, & Bell is hard to beet.

Tuesday, June 15: Clear pleasant day. Covered potatoes. Robert Martin called in the evening and got Jim Millers rifle. He is a hard fellow on the fast young women of the present age.

Wednesday, June 16: Clear pleasant day. Replanted corn till noon. Then went to Fayetteville to an exhibition of the Academy. Dodds Prin. Pretty good exhibition considering, but nothing extra. Music good.

Thursday, June 17: Clear day and very warm. Replanted corn. Mr Hamilton coming in the evening, we had some talk about old affairs. He stayed all night.

Friday, June 18: Clear and warm. Mr Hamilton got my horse to go out to see Morrison, when the Commencement was at Oxford, as we have some notion of going down.83 Harrowed corn. Went up to Vienna in the evening.


  • 50 Samuel W. Parker was a graduate of Miami University who for a time operated a private school in Connersville. In 1831 he became a lawyer and served two terms in the Indiana General Assembly. He was an ardent opponent of the Missouri Compromise. As an orator he was able to bring his hearers to "the wildest state of enthusiasm." He was president of the Junction Railroad and the Whitewater Coal Company. His death occurred on February 1, 1859. Biographical and Genealogical History of Wayne, Fayette, Union and Franklin Counties, Indiana (2 vols., Chicago, 1899), I, 239-240.
  • 51 A small town northwest of Connersville.
  • 52 Thomas Milligan is not identified as an Indiana University student.
  • 53 Commencement at Miami University, Oxford, Ohio, was scheduled for June 30. See entry for June 30.

Saturday, June 19: Clear morning. Went to Vienna. Harrowed corn. Rained some in the afternoon. Read some in Macauleys History of E. Rained very heavy in the evening.

Sunday, June 20: Clear day. Went to church. Heard two long sermons by Dr. Heron. Spent the evening in reading writing and smoking cigars. Retired pretty early. My ink has got thick, and made a blotch or two at the first.

Monday, June 21: Clear and very warm day. Commenced plowing corn. —plowed all day. Had most forgotten how, but got into the hang of it after a little practice. Had a big time with a cow.

Tuesday, June 22: Clear and exceeding warm. Finished replanting corn. Plowed in the afternoon. Read some in Macauley.

Wednesday, June 23: Clear and oppressively hot. Plowed corn. Read some in Macauley. Studied some at Geometry.

Thursday, June 24: Very hot day plowed corn. Read some in Macauley's H. Thermometer above 90 in the shade.

Friday, June 25: Another very hot day. plowed. Went up to Vienna in the evening. Heard that Fred Douglas of Rochester was to lecture in Connersville on the 29th.54

Saturday, June 26: Clear and very warm day. Harrowed corn till supper time. Read some in Macauley. Mary sent me three No of the N.Y. Ledger, which contained a very interesting story by E. Bennett, intitled, "Perils of the Border." Read at it till twelve o'clock.

Sunday, June 27: Clear, sultry and exceedingly hot. Went to Vienna to meeting. Heard a couple of sermons by Mr. Hutchinson. The road is jetting pretty dusty. Heard that Mr Hamilton was very unwell.

Monday, June 28: Pretty warm day. Plowed corn. Went up to Vienna in the evening.

Tuesday, June 29: Very warm day. Plowed all day. Rode out in the evening.

Wednesday, June 30: Intended starting to Oxford to attend Commencement this morning, but owing to circumstances beyond my control, with which I was surrounded, I did not get off. Rained some in the afternoon.

Thursday, July 1: Sultry and warm. Shower of rain about the middle of the forenoon. Another very heavy one about the middle of the afternoon. Read some in Macauley. Read early.

Friday, July 2: Very warm day. Rained a shower after dinner. Plowed all day. Went up to Vienna in the evening.

Saturday, July 3: Another warm day. Fine weather for corn to grow. Plowed all day. Felt pretty well run down after such a weeks work. Harvest coming on. It makes me sick to think of it.

Sunday, July 4: Clear and pretty warm. Went to church. Heard two long sermons by Dr. Heron. Did not feel very well.


  • 54 Frederick Douglas, orator, was born in 1817, a mulatto slave in Maryland, but he escaped as a young man and in 1841 began to deliver lectures against slavery which attracted much attention. In 1845-1847 he made a very successful lecture tour in England. He became a newspaper editor. Before his death in 1895 he was for five years United States marshal for the District of Columbia. The National Cyclopaedia of American Biography (New York, 1898-), II (1921), 309-310.

Monday, July 5: Clear pleasant day. Plowed corn. Couple of Ladies came in the evening and spent a few minuits.

Tuesday, July 5: Clear and pleasant. Plowed corn all day. Did not feel very well. Received a No. of the Yale Literary Magazine.55

Wednesday, July 7: Clear warm day. Plowed all day. Committed a declamation out of Sumner's Speech.

Thursday, July 8: Clear and warm. Plowed all day. Committed Cicero's Oration against Verres. I also committed seventy lines in Pope's "Wife of Bath." It is a pretty good thing, but rather vulgar for this fastidious age.

Friday, July 9: Clear and warm. Cradled Wheat all day.56" Not very good crop, the rust having damaged it.

Saturday, July 10: Threatens rain. Cut some wheat, but being very unwell did not "pitch in" very brisk. Read some in Macauleys History.

Sunday, July 11: Rained some last night. There was a slight shower this morning. Very warm and sultry. Went to church. Dr Heron preached a sermon on the Reserection. Came home through the rain.

Monday, July 12: Cloudy and cool. Finished cutting wheat about noon. Went to Connersville. Received a catalogue of I.U. forwarded by the kindness of Miss Lizzie. I also received three others, by the favor of Mr Elliott.

Tuesday, July 13: Cloudy and pleasant. Plowed all day. Read some in Macauleys History. In the evening a gentleman came to put in a pump in the well.

Wednesday, July 14: Clear and warm. Plowed all day. Nothing of importance worth noticing.

Thursday, July 15: Clear, warm and sultry. This is Commencement day at the Indiana U. when the senior gets to make his last effort, and leave college with his Sheepskin.

Friday, July 16: Clear and very warm. Plowed till noon, then went to laying the barn floor. Went up to Vienna, in the evening. Got a letter from Sol.

Saturday, July 17: Very warm and sultry. Worked at the barn.

Sunday, July 18: Clear and warm. Wind blowing. Went to Church. Heard two long sermons by Dr Heron. Robert Martin gave me a Sunday school book, and wanted me to help him with his class.

Monday, July 19: Clear and warm. Commenced cutting hay.

Tuesday, July 20: Clear and warm. Threatens rain. Hauled in hay.

Wednesday, July 21: Clear and warm. Mowed hay all day. John Miller and Lady, and two of his girls came in the evening. Old Johnny is a very pleasant man.

Thursday, July 22: Clear, sultry and warm. Hauled hay. The company left about ten A.M. Went to Connersville in the evening. Got Dr. Dailey's Bachelur57 sent to me by S. I. Kayler.


  • 55 An editor of the Yale Literary Magazine wrote Indiana University editors that "exchanges could not be made with inferior provincial publications."
  • 56 Wheat cut with a cradle was as tiring and backbreaking a job as existed on the farm. An arrangement of wooden strips caught the grain as the scythe was swung.
  • 57 This was Dr. Dailey's last baccalaureate for he had resigned the presidency before the next commencement in January, 1859.

Friday, July 23: Cloudy and warm. Rained some last night. Plowed all day. Went up to Vienna.

Saturday, July 24: Clear and warm. Plowed all day. Very dry time, the corn is suffering very much much from the drouth.

Sunday, July 25: Clear and tolerable pleasant. Went to church. Heard two long sermons by Dr. Heron. After meeting was out, went to James Millers, and stayed all night. Seen Miss Lizzie C.58

Monday, July 26: Clear and sultry. Got home about nine. Went to plowing.

Tuesday, July 27: Clear and very warm. Plowed all day.

Wednesday, July 28: Clear, warm and sultry. Finished plowing corn. Wrote some items for B. In the evening went into Connersville to hear a political speech by Judge Otto.59 It was emphatically a bore. It is strange men can't talk on any thing but Kansas.60

Thursday, July 29: Extremely hot. Mr Hamilton came last night. He left this morning. Went over to William Milligan's Stayed and talked a while with Ag. Rained a pretty good shower. Did various things to day. Read Scotts Mac Duff.

Friday, July 30: Cloudy morning. Went to cut some grass, but becoming indisposed I quit. Had a very bad headacke. Lay round all day. Ag came over and spent the day. Took a buggy ride up to Vienna in the evening.

Saturday, July 31: Cloudy morning. Went to help Mr. Forney thrash wheat. Pretty hot day. Did not feel very well. Threatens rain.

Sunday, August 1: Clear and very warm day. Went to church. Heard Dr. Heron. James Miller came home with me. In the evening we went to Gray's School House, to hear Mr Hutchinson preach. Very pleasant buggy riding. Seen several fine Ladies.

Monday, August 2: Cloudy. Rained very heavy last night. Mary & Lames stayed till after dinner. Hauled in a load of hay. Made a box for Mary to take home some flowers. Very warm, still threatens rain.

Tuesday, August 3: Cloudy morning. Rained a little. Pretty warm. Pulled weeds out of the corn. Read some in Macauleys History. Did not feel very well.

Wednesday, August 4: Clear warm day. Pulled weeds in the corn field till 4 P.M. then rigged up the buggy and went down to James Millers. Seen Miss Lizzie C. Stayed all night.

Thursday, August 5: Cloudy morning. Rigged up the "buss" and in company with four ladies and Jim Miller. Started for a blackberry patch, on Garrison Creek.81 It was an awful hot day. Had a big


  • 58 Miss Lizzie C is not to be confused with the Miss Lizzie of Bloom-irsgton.
  • 59 Probably William T. Otto who came to Indiana in 1836 and engaged in the practice of law until 1844 when the legislature elected him judge of the second judicial circuit. He was professor of law at Indiana University from 1847 to 1852. Wylie, Indiana University, 115-116.
  • 60 In the latter part of 1858 the question of statehood for Kansas was uppermost in all political discussions.
  • 61 Garrison Creek, a mill stream that rises in Fayette County, runs southeast into Franklin, and empties into the west fork of the Whitewater, on the west side.
time generally. Returned to Jim's about 9 P.M., pretty near "give out." Then went home.

Friday, August 6: Clear day. On last evening when I got home—found the thrashers had come on and taken out all the wheat. Was not spited. Went and helped Mr Forney to thrash. In the evening, took a buggy ride up to Vienna.

Saturday, August 7: Another hot day. Toped out a straw stack. After dinner rigged up the buggy and took my Mamma over to John Harris's. Had a pleasant time with the ladies. Read a letter that another lady had wrote to them in which she said a baby had been born that weighed 2 lbs. Finis for this page.

Sunday, August 8: Clear and pretty warm. Went to church. Heard a long Sermon by the Dr. He is going to be for the next three Sabbaths. Threathens rain, it is now thundering. 9 o'clock P.M. Thermometer about 100 in the shade.

Monday, August 9: Warm and sultry. Rained a little. Done several things around the house.

Tuesday, August 10: Clear and exceedingly warm. Thermometer 96 in the shade. Went to Connersville. Dan Rice's Show on hands62

Wednesday, August 11: Clear and very warm. Commenced sowing wheat. It is so warm can scarcely plow among the corn. Committed part of a declamation. Read some in Macauley.

Thursday, August 12: Clear and some what cooler. Plowed in wheat. Read some in Mac.—Wrote some. Did not feel very well.

Friday, August 13: Clear and pretty warm. Plowed in wheat till noon. Done some little turns about the house. The old folks were gone. Went to the water melon patch, and devoured one of them with delight.

Saturday, August 14: Clear and pleasant day. Did not do much of any thing. Loafed around a little, and done some little trifles.

Sunday, August 15: Cloudy morning. Did not go to Church, but stayed at home all day. Read some and eat onions, and biscuit.

Monday, August 16: Clear and pleasant. Helped to drive some hogs to Wagoner's that we sold I. Geeg for the 3 cts a pound. Got home before dinner. After dinner rigged up the buggy and took my Mamma to John Harris. Had a big time with the gals—made arrangements for a spree.

Tuesday, August 17: Clear and warm. Hauled dirt for the stable. Went after a load of saw dust to the Steam mill. James Nisbet called in and stayed awhile.

Wednesday, August 18: Clear and warm. Cut down a tree to make boards. Very dry and warm.

Thursday, August 19: Clear and warm day. Split some boards. In the evening Robert McKee and his lady Mary Ann of Lafaette came. My old friend Mary Ann looks much better than when she left here.

Friday, August 20: Did not get up very early. Had a big time with


  • 62 The Dan Rice circus was one of the most noted traveling attractions of the pre-Civil War years.
Mary Ann. She is one of the most loving and friendly souls I ever seen. She left about ten o'clock. Went to Nisbetts in the afternoon.

Saturday, August 21: Clear and not so warm. Went to help Nisbets thrash wheat. The old folks left on a spree, to Decatur C. I expect to have a good time keeping house and squeezing gals while they are gone.

Sunday, August 22: Clear and cool. Did not go to church as I did not feel very well. Spent the day reading and sleeping. Retired early.

Monday, August 23: Clear and quite cool. Went to Connersville. Hauled some wood. Went over to Will Milligans and stayed for supper. Had a good time with Ag.

Tuesday, August 24: Clear and cool. Spent the forenoon reading a long novel by Cobb Jr. Went up to Vienna after dinner and spent the afternoon. Dad and Mom got home.

Wednesday, August 25: Clear and pleasant. Cut some logs. Read some in a novel. A novel is a very good thing to indulge and refresh the mind when the body is wearied and the mind inactive.

Thursday, August 26: Cloudy and threatens rain. It is very dry and dusty. Helped erect a shed for wood. Rained some after dinner. Mr Kerr of Dunlapsville called in out of the rain. He give me several interesting items about the old place.

Friday, August 27: Cloudy and warm. Done some little shores. After dinner went to Vienna and then to Mr. Little's. Spent two or three hours with Miss Ellen. Started home and got caught in the rain at Will Milligans. Stopped till after supper.

Saturday, August 28: Raining. Cleared off about ten. Went to Connersville. Attended the Republican Convention. Heard Speeches by Bennett of Union,63 Sam Parker, and others. Got home about dark.

Sunday, August 29: Cool and cloudy. Went to the Prorenata Church to meeting. Heard a sermon by Dodds. In the evening it was very cool.

Monday, August 30: Cloudy and very cool for the season. Plowed in wheat. Did not feel very well. Commenced using Wood's Hair tonic.

Tuesday, August 31: Clear and pleasant. Plowed in wheat. Committed part of the Oration of Emmett, the Irish patriot. Retired early.

Wednesday, September 1: Clear and pleasant. Plowed in wheat. Committed the remainder of Emmett's oration.

Thursday, September 2: Cloudy and warm. Hauled gravel on the road till noon. Rained a little. Plowed in some more wheat. Gassed a while on politics. Democrat County Con. met in Connersville.

Friday, September 3: Wet morning. Plowed off about ten. Finished sowing wheat. Wrote some. Got a letter from my magnanimous chum. He was right side up.

Saturday, September 4: Clear cool and blowing. Hauled some boards


  • 63 Thomas W. Bennett was born on February 16, 1831, and was graduated from Asbury University at Greencastle in 1854. In 1858 he was elected state senator from Fayette and Union counties. At the outbreak of the Civil War, he enlisted and in 1864 became a brigadier-general. In 1871, President U. S. Grant appointed him governer of Idaho Territory. A Biographical History of Eminent and Self-Made Men of the State of Indiana, I, District 6, pp. 7-8.
and covered a small shed. Loafed round in the afternoon and didn't do much of any thing.

Sunday, September 5: Clear and cool. Went to church, after upsetting my stand, and spilling the ink over the floor. Did not feel very well.

Monday, September 6: Clear pleasant day. Cut down a tree and sawed some timber for posts. Did not feel very well, having a slight headache. Retired early.

Tuesday, September 7: Clear and pretty warm. Sawed and split posts. The World's Fair of Fayette County Commences to day at Connersville. A big time is expected.

Wednesday, September 8: Clear and warm. Went to the World's Fair at Connersville. Had a pretty large time. A wonderful turn out of fine ladies with hoops. Heard a speech by Horace Greely of N.Y.64 A Grand display of fire works in the evening.

Thursday, September 9: Clear and warm as ever. Went back to the big fair to see the fine ladies and the sights generally. Had a fine time eating water melon with some gals of the dimpled chin race.

Friday, September 10: Raining. Quit about 8 o'clock. Went to the field to get my horse. Bridled him & got on, but he soon throwed me off and strained my ancle. Led him to the house—saddled him and went to Vienna. Had a big through with Sam McKee on politics. Loafed round all day.

Saturday, September 11: Clear and quite cool. Split and hauled some posts. Did not feel very well. Retired early.

Sunday, September 12: Clear and cool. Went to Church. Seen John Elliott & Rose. They came home with us in the evening. Had a good talk with my old friend Rose. She looks as well as ever.

Monday, September 13: Clear and pleasant. Rose & John started for home. Father and Mother went along, and left me to keep bachlors hall. Went to the Steam Mill after plank.

Tuesday, September 14: Clear and warm. Went to Connersville. Got back about noon. Commenced to build a garden fence.

Wednesday, September 15: Clear and pretty warm and dry. Worked at the fence. Pretty dry keeping house by one's self. It is enough to make a person think of Matrimony.

Thursday, September 16: Rose with a slight head-ache which increased till it became very bad. Did nothing. Slept part of the day. The folks got home about dark, and I give up house keeping. Bill Laughlin called in to see me.

Friday, September 17: Warm and dry. Dust flying in all directions. Went to Connersville. Started my books by express for Bloomington. Subscribed for Telegraph Vol. 5 No. 27. Purchased some articles.

Saturday, September 18: Clear and warm. Built fence. Went to Vienna.


  • 64 Horace Greeley, born on February 3, 1811, at Amherst, New Hampshire, established the New YorkTribune on April 10, 1841. He was among the first editors to join the Republican party, and on February 22, 1856, attended the national organization meeting at Pittsburgh. In 1872 he was nominated by the Democratic national convention for president. Allan Nevins, "Horace Greeley," Dictionary of American Biography (21 vols., New York, 1943), VII, 528-534.

Sunday, September 19: Clear warm day. Went to church. Heard a sermon on the fashions of the day.65 Went to Jim Millers. Spent the evening with Miss Lizzie—eat some water-melons.

Monday, September 20: Started to Neff's corner. See John C. Robinson. Got to Neff's corner seen Mr Hamilton and then started home. Got home about two. Mr. Laughlin called in the evening. Jim Miller and Maria came in the evening.

Tuesday, September 21: About three o'clock Jim Miller and myself started for Louisville. Got there about 8 o'clock, At ten the cars came and we went together to Indianap[olis]. I went on to Greencastle. Seen Woodcock. Went to the exbition of the Sen. class of Asbury Univs.66

Wednesday, September 22: Stayed at Jenes house last night. At eight started for Bloomington. Got there at twelve. Seen Friend Elliott and several more. Called in at the Proff. In the evening went to see Miss Lizzie and spent one of the pleasantest evenings imaginable.

Thursday, September 23: Clear and dry. College opened this morning. Went down and got into the Sophomore Class. Read some latin. Reading Horace Satires. Going to study Trigenomety, Breairs Rhetoric

Friday, September 24: Rose early. Attended recitations. At night went to the Athenian Society. Had a big time.

Saturday, September 25: Rose early. Went to the Covenanter church67 to hear a discussion on Union. Pretty sharp debate. Went to meeting their also as their is to be a sacrament to morrow. Spent a very pleasant evening with Miss Lizzie.

Sunday, September 26: Went to church at Wylie Church. Sacrament was dispensed. Attended the funeral of (I forget the name). In the evening went with Miss Lizzie to church.

Monday, September 27: Attended college. Very dry and dusty. Passed examination.

Tuesday, September 28: Clear and pretty warm. Went to college. Nothing of importance going on.

Wednesday, September 29: Warm day. In the afternoon went with "my duck" to the Monroe County Fair. Had a good time. In the evening went to a promenade concert which was a grand bore. Lessons minus.

Thursday, September 30: Went to college and recited in Mathematics. Got excused and left. Went to the fair and spent a very pleasant evening with some ladies. Studied some.


  • 65 On another page at the back of the diary Louden recorded: "Garrison Creek Church, Sept. 19th, 1858. The old Dr is speaking on the fashions of the day, with special reference to the ladies and their 'round tires like the moon.' He did not condemn the practice, either of wearing Bloomers, Hoops, Jewelry or any other ornaments of apparel, but merely said the sin was in setting our hearts up [on] them."
  • 66 Indiana Asbury University founded in the late thirties became DePauw University when Washington Charles DePauw, a staunch New Albany Methodist, in 1881 made a will leaving what was then a large estate to the institution. William W. Sweet, Indiana Asbury-DePauw University, 1837-1937 (New York, 1937), 140.
  • 67 Covenanter was a term commonly applied to the Reformed Presbyterian church.

Friday, October 1: Clear and warm. Went to college. At ten o'clock W. B. Laughlin68 came down. Spent the afternoon with him. In the evening went to Society. Delivered an original.69 Came home early.

Saturday, October 2: Went to college. Declaimed under Prof. Wylie. In the evening went with "my bonny las" out to Mr. Cerrys. Had a good time with Miss Lu. and Mat Got home about eleven o'clock.

Sunday, October 3: Went to Prof. Wylies church. Pretty warm day. Went to chapel with Miss Lizzie, who is a perfect angel. Prof. Wylie lectured. Accompanied my dearest to church at night. Went to the Baptist church. Heard a very rediculous sermon.

Monday, October 4: Pretty warm. Rose early. Went to college. Got home at eleven. Rained some in the afternoon. Friend Elliott was very unwell. Got caught in the rain coming from the washer womans.

Tuesday, October 5: Cloudy and pleasant. Went to college. Rained most of the afternoon. John Blair stopped in the evening. Kindled a fire for the first time this fall. Studying hard on Trigonometry.

Wednesday, October 6: Went to college. Clear and pleasant day. Recited Rhetoric to Mr Given. In the evening went down to M Givens room. Got home after dark.

Thursday, October 7: Went to college as usual. Recited in all the departments. Recited Rhetoric to the old Dr.70 Studied out fifty lines in the Satires of Horace. Purchased a shaul.

Friday, October 8: Pretty cool day. Went to college. Recited in all except Rhetoric. Studied in the afternoon. Went to Society Declaimed. Was elected Secratary. Got home about eleven.

Saturday, October 9: Pretty cool morning. Went to college. Read a composition under Prof. Wylie. Took a walk out into the country. In the evening went to see My Dear, and stayed with her till twelve.

Sunday, October 10: Tolerable pleasant day. Went to church. Went to chapel. Walked home with Miss Lizzie. Commenced to rain. In the evening took Miss Lizzie out to Methodist church, where Mr Binley preached. Got home about ten.

Monday, October 11: Damp and drizzly day. Went to college. Prof. Kirkwood being [sick] Prof. Given heard the Mathematical department. Did not feel very well during the afternoon. Still raining at this hour, ten o'clock P.M.

Tuesday, October 12: Wet damp morning. Went to college. This is election day, and politics pretty high. Cleared off about noon. In the evening, in company with friend Elliott, went out to Mr McKinleys. Had a very pleasant time [with] Miss Hannah, Got home about eleven.

Wednesday, October 13: Went to college. Recited as usual. Very pleasant day. Prof. Ballantine told us he would be absent two day[s]. In the evening called in at Prof Woodburns for a few minuits. Heard


  • 68 William B. Laughlin from Rushville, Indiana, was a senior in 1859. Wylie, Indiana University, 423.
  • 69 Participation in the programs of the literary societies was divided among declamations, orations, readings, and original essays.
  • 70 The "old Dr." was President Daily who taught Rhetoric in 1858.
that my old ∗ Miss Bell & Bill Little had got the knot tied on the 4th. Long life, happiness and felicity to them.

Thursday, October 14: Clear fine day. Went to college Mr Given heard the class. Did not stay for rhetoric. Did not feel very well. Retired pretty early.

Friday, October 15: Went to college. Recited as usual. Stoped at Mr Givens room a short time. Studied some in the after noon. Went to Society. Wrote the minuits. Got home about one.

Saturday, October 16: Did not get up very early. Went to college early. This was public day. Wrote the minuits by noon. Took a ramble after dinner. In the evening went to see Miss Lizzie. Had a pleasant time.

Sunday, October 17: Went to Prof. Wylie's church. Went to Chapel. Did not think much of this day's lecture. In the evening took Miss Lizzie to M[issionary] meeting. Heard a good sermon.

Monday, October 18: Clear day and pretty warm. Went to college. Recited as usual. Threatened rain a little in the evening.

Tuesday, October 19: Cloudy. Went to college. Nothing new. Commenced raining in the evening. Raining very heavy at this hour, ten O'clock.

Wednesday, October 20: Wet morning. Went to college. Recited as usual. Studied in the afternoon.

Thursday, October 21: Clear and pleasant. Went to college. Did not recite in Rhetoric. Attended a called meeting of Athenian Soc. which lasted during the afternoon. Got up some protests. In the evening took my duck to the Contest between the Liter. Soc. It was a poor thing.

Friday, October 22: Clear and warm. Not having my lessons did not tend college. In the evening went to Soc. Debated on Lecompten Ques. The election for Spring Speakers coming off. I was chosen as one. After we got home, Messrs Elliott, Hood, Laughlin and myself went out on a Shivaree.71

Saturday, October 23: Clear, pleasant day. Had a bad headache. Went to college and done my duty. Came home and slept till noon. After dinner got a buggy and took my duck out to Mr. Crow's. Had a fine time with Miss Lu. Got back about dark. Went to the county library and joined the Sigma Xie Fraternity.72

Sunday, October 24: Pleasant day. Went to Church. Not feeling very well, did not attend lecture. At night took my duck to M. meeting & after we got back talked over past events.

Monday, October 25: Cloudy and raining some. Went to college. About ten o'clock the rain came down thick and fast. Read out my latin.


  • 71 Charivari is a practice of serenading a newly married couple by beating tin pans and drums, blowing horns, and ringing bells. The tumult is still a common practice in rural Indiana.
  • 72 Louden's initiation apparently did not include the correct spelling of the fraternity name, Sigma Chi. The fraternity, founded at Miami University in 1855, was installed at Indiana in the same year. In the beginning fraternities met either at private homes or in public rooms, such as the library. Later halls on or near the square were rented for meetings. Fraternity houses were a rather late development.

Tuesday, October 26: Still raining a little. Went to college. After dinner D. F. Smith73 came up and helped me to get out my lesson. Mr. Blair called in a while. Retired about ten.

Wednesday, October 27: Raining. Went to college. Recited as usual. After dinner it clouded up and the rain came down thick and fast most of the evening and is still falling ten o'clock P.M.

Thursday, October 28: Rose pretty early. Went to college. Very cloudy day. After dinner commenced to rain. Very damp time. Retired pretty early.

Friday, October 29: Rose early. Went to college. Took a walk after dinner. In the evening went to Society. Had a pretty good time. Got home about eleven.

Saturday, October 30: Went to chapel service. Did not stay for performance. After dinner called at Proff. in company with friend Elliott. In the evening went to a meeting of the fraternity of —.

Sunday, October 31: Went to church at the N.S. Presbyterian. Went to chapel. Went to prayer meeting. In the evening took Miss Lizzie to M. meeting. Cloudy day.

Monday, November 1: Rose pretty early. Went to college. Commenced the study of Surveying. Commenced to rain after dinner and continued all evening. Read a piece, about Dr Daily, got up by Murphy.

Tuesday, November 2: Still raining.

November 3, 4, and 5 [No entries.]

Saturday, November 6: Cloudy day. Raining. Went to public performance. Went to the court house to hear Hughes plead.74 In the evening went to see Miss Lizzie. Had a fine time.

Sunday, November 7: Cloudy and cool. Went to church. Went to chapel. In the evening it was raining and I did not go to Church.

Monday, November 8: Still cloudy and raining some, as it has been doing for the last ten days. Went to college.

Tuesday, November 9: Cloudy day. Went to college. Got an introduction to Miss Gourley. In the evening bid her and Mrs. McQuisten of Ohio Good bye, as they were starting home.

Wednesday, November 10: Cloudy and cool. Tryed to Snow some. Went to college. Did not recite in rhetoric. In the evening, in company with Mr Elliott, went out to Mr. Mackinleys. Had a pretty good time. Got into a bur patch coming home.

Thursday, November 11: Cloudy and pretty cool. Attended college. Played a game of ball after dinner, with Friends Laughlin, Hodd and Elliott. Felt pretty sleepy in the after noon.

Friday, November 12: Cloudy and cool. Went to college. Got excused from Languages and Rhetoric. Came home and wrote a Fictitious narative. Went to Society. Rained most of the night.


  • 73 Probably Dudley F. Smith from Stanford who was a member of the class of 1861. Ibid., 450.
  • 74 James Hughes, congressman, jurist, and professor of law, was born November 24, 1823, at Homestead, Maryland. In 1859 he was appointed judge of the United States Court of Claims. From 1857 to 1860 he served as a member of the Indiana University Board of Trustees. Myers, Trustees and Officers of Indiana University, 233-236.

Saturday, November 13: Cloudy and cold. Went to college and declaimed in Prof. Wylie's department. In the afternoon went to college to see about organizing a "Society of Religious Inquiry. Was appointed on a com. to draft a constitution. Went to S.

Sunday, November 14: Cloudy and cool. Went to church. In the afternoon took Miss Lizzie to chapel. At night took her to O.S.P. church. Commenced to snow about dark.

Monday, November 15: Cold morning. Pretty good snow on the ground. Very cold day. Went to college. Cleared off in the evening and froze pretty hard.

Tuesday, November 16: Cold morning. First clear day for three weeks. Went to college. In the afternoon went with some more of the Sophs, to Prof. Woodburn survey.

Wednesday, November 17: Clear morning. Very cold. Went to college. In the afternoon went to college to make some experiments with the Theodolite.75 In the evening went to see my "duck". Had a fine time.

Thursday, November 18: Pleasant day. Went to college. Studied in the afternoon.

Friday, November 19: Pleasant day. Clear. Went to college. At eleven o'clock the regular Sopomore class adjourned, without reciting rhetoric. In the evening went to Society. Did not get home till 1 o'clock.

Saturday, November 20: Cloudy and chilly. Commenced snowing about nine A.M. Went to college. Helped to make a constitution for a new Society. In the evening went to see my "duck."

Sunday, November 21: Cool morning. Did not rise very early. Did not go to church. Snow about 4 inches deep. Went to chapel. In the evening took Miss Lizzie to meeting.

Monday, November 22: Rose early. Went to college. Recited as usual. Snowed all day. Snow about half-foot deep. Retired at half past ten.

Tuesday, November 23: Rose early. Went to college recited and returned home. Thawed some during the evening.

Wednesday, November 24: Went to college. Recited as usual. The Dr. tried to bore the Rhetoric class. In the evening went to see Miss Lizzie. Got home about twelve.

Thursday, November 25: No. college today it being appointed as a thanksgiving day by the Gov. Went to college half-past ten to hear a sermon by Mr. Gillet. In the afternoon went and fixed up the hall for the exhibition. At night took Miss Lizzie to it. Had a pretty good exhibition.

Friday, November 26: Went to college. Recited as usual. In the evening went to Society. Had a pretty exciting time over a paper sent in by the Philos. We laid it on the table. Friend Springer called in." Got home about twelve.


  • 75 An instrument for measuring horizontal and, usually, vertical angles. This was one of the few physical instruments owned by the University in 1858.
  • 76 William M. Springer, a native of Sullivan County, Indiana, was born on May 30, 1836. He became very prominent in political circles in the neighboring state of Illinois. Wylie, Indiana University, 222.

Saturday, November 27: Rose with a pretty bad head-ache. It being public day, went to college. At ten o'clock attended a meeting to adopt a constitution for a religious Society. Not getting the time to suit me I left. Was very sick during the afternoon. Did not eat any thing all day. Rained all day.

Sunday, November 28: Was still unwell. Did not eat any breakfast. Was in bed most of the day. Felt a little better in the evening. Cloudy and chilly.

Monday, November 29: Clear day. Did not go to college, on account of being very unwell. In the afternoon went to the depot to see friend Edgar start home. Had a dish of oysters with friend Hood.

Tuesday, November 30: Clear and cool. Went to college. Studied some during the evening. At night went to see Miss Lizzie. Had a very pleasant time.

Wednesday, December 1: Cloudy and chilly. Went to college. Did not recite Rhetoric, as the Dr. was gone. Report says he is gone to Indianapolis to try to move the college up there. Did not feel like studying.

Thursday, December 2: Cloudy and cool. Went to college. The Dr. not back yet. Was very unwel all day.

Friday, December 3: Cloudy and misting. Did not attend college, on account of bad health. In the afternoon went to a meeting of the Erolathaian Society. Raining a little. At night went to Athenian. Declaimed. Caught a bad cold. Got home at one.

Saturday, December 4: Raining. Did not go to college. In the afternoon went and got some cherry, poplar, & dog-wood bark to make bitters. Miss Rhoda & Miss Service calling in, in the evening spent the afternoon with them. At night went to see my "duck". Had a pleasant time. Rained very heavy.

Sunday, December 5: Cleared off this morning. Went to Prof. Wylies church. Being unwel in the afternoon, stayed in my room. Had something like a chill in the evening.

Monday, December 6: Very pleasant morning. Went to college, though very unwel. Got a bottle of "old Bourbon" and made up my bitters. Was very sick at night.

Tuesday, December 7: Cool and clear morning. Clouded up about noon. Did not attend college. In the afternoon went up to town and subscribed for Harpers Magazine and the New York Tribune. At night had a return of the chills. Did not study any. Retired early.

Wednesday, December 8: Cold and cloudy. Did not go to college. Was not very well, in bodily health, and had very bad cold. Studied a little in the afternoon.

Thursday, December 9: Cold. Went to college. Come pretty near giving out before I got back.

Friday, December 10: Clear and pleasant. Went to college. Did not stay for Rhetoric on account of having a very bad cold. Did not go to Society. Read Shakespeare "Merry Wives of Windsor."

Saturday, December 11: Clear in the morning. Went to college. Clouded up in the afternoon. At night went to a meeting of the S.—Eat a dish of oysters with friend Hood.

Sunday, December 12: Cloudy and misting a little. Went to Prof. Wylies church. Went to chapel. Went to prayer meeting. Had a remark made about me going, instead of being persuaded away by a companion. At night went to the O.S.P. church. Retired early.

Monday, December 13: Cloudy and raining a little. Cleared off about ten. Went to college. Did not recite languages. Went to the Republican office and got a paper. Retired pretty early.

Tuesday, December 14: Raining very heavy. Went to college through the rain. Recited as usual. Studied in the afternoon. At night went to see my "duck". Had a good time.

Wednesday, December 15: Cloudy. Went to college. Tryed to snow. Recited as usual. Cleared off in the evening. Had a very bad cough. Retired pretty early.

Thursday, December 16: Clear and cool. Went to college. Recited as usual. Attended a called meeting of the Sophomore class at half-past eleven. Spent the afternoon as usual.

Friday, December 17: Clear and pleasant. Went to college. The last day of recitation. In the afternoon went to a meeting of the Erolethian Society. At night went to the Athenian. Mr. Hawhee and myself called in at Proff. W. in the afternoon.

Saturday, December 18: Clear morning. Went to college. Public day. After exercises were over attended a meeting of the Sophomore class for the purpose of electing speakers for their exhibition at the opening of the summer term. I was elected as one of the number. Loafed in the afternoon. At night went to see my "duck".

Sunday, December 19: Cloudy and raining. Went in company with friend Elliott & Hood to Proff. Wylies church. Slept part of the afternoon. Did not go out at night on account of the rain.

Monday, December 20: Rose pretty early. Still raining. Went to college. Came home after prayers. Went to Mr Riley's room. At three o'clock went to be examined on rhetoric. Got off fine. At night went to see my "duck."

Tuesday, December 21: Still raining. Went to chapel. Went to Robisons room. At eleven o'clock attended a called meeting of the Sophomore class. Had a pretty high time generally. At two went to be examined on languages. At night went to Mr Lemon's room.77 Cleared off.

Wednesday, December 22: Pleasant day. Was not very well. Studied some little but not much.

Thursday, December 23: Clear pleasant morning. Was very unwell. Went to college. Was examined on Trigonometry. Spent the afternoon running round. Had a meeting of the Sop. class at ten. Handed in my resignation as speaker.

Friday, December 24: Clear, pleasant morning. Went to chapel to see the session wind up. Appointed a meeting of the Athenians boys in Hansons room to night to see about a party. Went with friend Elliott to Mr Henley's. Met at night & appointed a party for 30th. Com. Louden, Lemon, Hood.


  • 77 Probably Alexander D. Lemon who was a native of Lawrence County, Indiana. Ibid., 222.

Saturday, December 25: Clear pleasant day. Read some and loafed some. Spent the day numerous ways. At night went to see Miss Lizzie.

Sunday, December 26: Raining very heavy. Did not attend church. In the evening took a long walk with John Hood. At night went with my "duck" to N.S.P. church.

Monday, December 27: Raining a little. After dinner went down town to see Homer Lemon about the party. Read some in Prescotts History of Ferdinad & Isabelle.

Tuesday, December 28: Spent the day running round town. Pleasant weather for the time of the year. At night went to see my "duck". Had a very pleasant time.

Wednesday, December 29: Cloudy. After dinner walked up the railroad with friend Hood to see freight train that had smashed up, about five miles up. Road back on the express.

Thursday, December 30: Raining. Went down after dinner to purcahse refreshments for the party in the Athenian Hall. Bought a lot of Nuts & Candies. In the evening took Miss Lizzie down. Very muddy. Pretty large crowd. Had a good time generally. Got home about two.

Friday, December 31: Went to college to clean out the Hall. Got it done about twelve. Slept in the after noon. After supper went to Mr. Lemons. Then went to Mr. Hawhee's room. Spent some time there, collecting a crowd, and making out a programme for a grand serenade. A little after nine, Messrs Hanson,78 Lemon, Hawee, Hood, Alexander79 Myres and myself, all started out with two flutes, and went regularly round town. At Mr Isenhour's80 we had the good fortune to have some cake passed out to us, which we eat with thanks to the fair donors. About one o'clock we broke up, having passed from the year eighteen hundrd & fifty eight to that of nine.


  • 78 Levi Hanson, a native of Harrodsburg, Indiana, and a member of the class of 1859. Ibid., 411.
  • 70 Probably John D. Alexander of Bloomington who was a member of Louden's class. Ibid., 226.
  • 80 John R. Isenhower was born on May 6,1883, near Ellettsville. He received his degree in law in 1859. On September 29, 1863, he married Sallie L. Lester of Bloomfield.



Published by the Indiana University Department of History.