Using Evidence of Adult Brain Plasticity to Inform Early Identification of Extreme Antisocial Behavior in Children

Main Article Content

Elizabeth Timberlake

Abstract

As of 2010, approximately 500,000 adult psychopaths were incarcerated for heinous crimes. Historically, incarceration has been the response to extreme antisocial behavior of adult psychopaths, but research consistently shows that punitive measures are ineffective treatment to reform psychopaths. In contrast, current research on the plasticity of the adult human brain argues that the brain can change through adulthood and that therapy should therefore be sought for them. This article highlights brain plasticity in the adult, and argues that teachers should know early markers of psychopathy in order to design interventions for children who display extreme antisocial behaviors, and therefore reduce the likelihood that children with conduct problems will become adult psychopaths.

Article Details

How to Cite
Timberlake, E. (1). Using Evidence of Adult Brain Plasticity to Inform Early Identification of Extreme Antisocial Behavior in Children. The Undergraduate Journal of Law & Disorder, 5, 29-36. Retrieved from https://scholarworks.iu.edu/journals/index.php/lad/article/view/20706
Section
Articles