Do Students Overestimate Their Contribution to Class? Congruence of Student and Professor Ratings of Class Participation

Main Article Content

Megan L Meyer
Stacy A McDonald
Lynn DellaPietra
Matthew Wiechnik
Kimberly Dasch-Yee

Abstract

As student participation is an essential component of many classes, this research attempted to foster congruence between student and professor ratings of class participation. Study 1 (N = 196) explored the utility of a detailed grading rubric in assessing class participation. As predicted, providing students and faculty with the same rubric resulted in a moderate correlation between their ratings. Consistent with previous research, results indicated a mean difference between student and professor ratings, particularly for low participators. Utilizing this rubric, Study 2 (N = 87) examined congruency at mid- and end-term. Contrary to what was predicted, feedback provided at mid-term did not increase congruence at end-term. A potential implication of this finding is underdeveloped metacognitive skills in low participators. Perhaps, more frequent and substantive feedback is essential for these students.

Downloads

Download data is not yet available.

Article Details

How to Cite
Meyer, M., McDonald, S., DellaPietra, L., Wiechnik, M., & Dasch-Yee, K. (2018). Do Students Overestimate Their Contribution to Class? Congruence of Student and Professor Ratings of Class Participation. Journal of the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning, 18(3). https://doi.org/10.14434/josotl.v18i3.21516
Section
Articles
Author Biographies

Megan L Meyer, Holy Family University

Department of Psychology

Associate Professor

Stacy A McDonald, Holy Family University

Department of Psychology

Associate Professor

Lynn DellaPietra, Marymount California University

Business, Leadership and Psychology

Professor

Kimberly Dasch-Yee, Holy Family University

Department of Psychology

Associate Professor