Title:
A Newspaper Index: "Western Censor" and "Journal," of Indianapolis, 1823 to 1827, Inclusive—First Instalment

Author:
George S. Cottman

Date:
1906

Source:
Indiana Magazine of History, Volume 2, Issue 3, pp 151-154

Article Type:
Article

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A NEWSPAPER INDEX.

"WESTERN CENSOR" AND "JOURNAL," OF INDIANAPOLIS, 1823 TO 1827, INCLUSIVE—FIRST INSTALMENT.

[The Western Censor and Emigranl's Guide, the second paper launched in Indianapolis, and its successor, the Indiana Journal, are the only early papers of which there are complete files accessible to the public. For that reason they have a particular value, and the following index may prove of interest and service to many of our readers. The classification of newspaper matter is difficult owing to its heterogeneous character. In this index we have, with a few exceptions, confined ourselves to such matter as bears, directly or indirectly, upon the history of Indianapolis, or which reflects phases of early life there. We have deemed the chronological arrangement preferable to the alphabetical scheme. The first issue of The Western Censor appeared March 7, 1823. January 11, 1825, it became The Indiana Journal. The bound files may be found in the Indianapolis Public Library.]

1823—WESTERN CENSOR.

  • First issue, reasons for delay of.—March 7.
  • Indianapolis, description of.—March 7.
  • Communications, excess of.—April 2.
  • Sunday-school, first meeting of, to be held at Scudder's cabinet-shop.—April 2. (Other matter pertaining to Sunday-school throughout early numbers.)
  • Roads, State.—May 14.
  • Squirrel killing.—May 14.
  • Divorce cases.—May 14.
  • Northern Indiana.—May 21.
  • Advertisement for books loaned.—May 21.
  • Trees, law affecting the cutting of in Indianapolis.—June 4.
  • Mails.—June 11.
  • Presbyterian church, the first.—June 11. (See also June 18.)
  • Indians on White river, and white woman captive.—June 11.
  • White river.—June 18.
  • Contribution: "Humphrey Ploughshare's" criticism of town ways.—June 18.
  • Fourth of July barbecue (ad.)—June 25.
  • Merchandise: New store and list of articles kept.—July 2.
  • Letters advertised.—July 2. [Lists of letters of considerable length were periodically published, and the custom seems curious. Why, in a backwoods village of six hundred people, should the advertising of unclaimed letters be necessary?]
  • Fourth of July oration, by Morris Morris.—July 9.
  • Advertisement: "Attention to Borrowers!"—July 9.
  • Candidates for office, list of.—July 16.
  • Rattlesnakes in Marion county.—Aug. 18.
  • Indianapolis , population of, 600 or 700 people (editorial).—Sept. 22.
  • Contribution: "Conduct to be Observed on Entering a Store" (satirical).—Sept. 29.
  • Indianapolis and the New Purchase.—Oct. 6.
  • Roads.—Oct. 20. (See also Dec. 15.)
  • Apple trees and nursery.—Oct. 20.
  • Delinquent taxes, sale of lots for in Indianapolis .—Dec. 1. (Christopher Harrison, commissioner, a lot holder).

1824

  • Tavern: Thomas Chinn's "Traveller's Hall."—Jan. 5.
  • Prices of corn, pork and potatoes (ad.)—Jan. 5.
  • Population, influx of in anticipation of coming legislature.—Feb. 16.
  • Donation lands, advertisement for leasing.—Feb. 16.
  • Furs and tallow for subscriptions, etc. (ad.)—Feb. 16.
  • Social supper.—Feb. 24.
  • Public Meeting "to consult on the propriety of taking care of the graveyard."—March 8. (Also March 16.)
  • Mails; six weeks to Bloomington.—March 22.
  • Tan-yard near Pogue's run.—March 22.
  • Potatoes, varieties of; Early Whites, Large Red, Long Pale Red, Large Early Blue.—March 22.
  • School, teachers, etc.—April 5 (first column.)
  • Indian murders at Pendleton (differing somewhat from the ordinary account).—April 5.
  • Plasterer, advertisement of; probably the first.—April 5.
  • Chairs for legislative halls, advertisement for.—April 19.
  • Commodities for currency: Merchandise in exchange for "ginseng, beeswax, honey, sugar, deer and fur skins, or almost anything else in preference to promises. For cash only, powder, shot, whisky, salt." (John Givan's ad.)—April 26.
  • Sunday-school, long report about; also editorial.—May 3.
  • Importation: Arrival of keel-boat, "Dandy," with 28 tons of salt and whisky.—May 17.
  • Danville, locating of.—July 20. (Also Aug. 31).
  • School examination.—July 13. (School matter in July 27.)
  • Captain Riley, famous traveler, located on St. Mary's river.
  • Advocate of Wabash canal.—Aug. 31.
  • Emigration to Indianapolis.—Oct. 19.
  • Sale of Donation out-lots (ad.)—Nov. 16.
  • Military election.—Dec. 7. (Also Dec. 14.

1825—INDIANA JOURNAL.

  • Legislature: Coming of the legislators, etc. First meeting.—Jan. 11.
  • Mails, arrival of.—Jan. 18.
  • Land office, James B. Ray on removal of to Indianapolis.—Jan. 25.
  • Legislators, nativity of.—Feb. 1.
  • Indianapolis, letter about.—Feb. 1. (Also Feb. 8)
  • Whetzell's trace: Petition of Jacob Whetzell praying compensation for cutting trace (in Senate proceedings).—Feb. 15.
  • Female Bible Society formed.—April 19.
  • Manufacture of glass at New Albany.—April 26.
  • Lots in Indianapolis, prices of.—May 3.
  • Sabbath school.—May 3.
  • James B. Ray, campaign letter to the public.—June 7. (For burlesque on Ray, see July 19).
  • Agricultural Society.—July 26. (See also, for formation of society, Sept. 6).
  • Land office, coming of, to Indianapolis.—Sept. 27.
  • Settlers, coming of; prospects of Indianapolis.—Sept. 27.
  • Road to Fort Wayne, laying out of; mention of Indian trace.—Oct. 11.
  • Bible Society, forming of.—Nov. 29.

1826

  • Sabbath school for adults.—April 16.
  • John Conner, death of.—April 25. (For W. H. Harrison on John Conner see July 20, 1824. Conner's estate, Nov. 28).
  • Population of Indianapolis.—March 7. (760 people; 200 voters; 61 unmarried men; 48 unmarried women).
  • National Road.—Nov. 14.
  • Bible Society, Marion county.—Nov. 21.

1827

  • Legislature and State conditions.—Jan. 2.
  • Alexander Ralston, death of; with sketch.—Jan. 9.
  • Indianapolis in 1827.—Feb. 20.
  • Leasings on the Donation.—Feb. 20.
  • Female Bible Society.—March 20.
  • Indian treaty.—March 27. (Treaty of Oct. 16, 1826, securing Michigan road lands, and signed by all concerned. These signatures not appended to the official report in American State Papers. Also, "reserves" specified.)
  • Lots, sale of in Indianapolis (ad.)—April 3. (Also May 15).
  • Mail routes.—May 1. (Also Aug. 7).
  • White river, description of.—May 1.
  • Rattlesnake oil, advertisement for.—June 5.
  • Internal improvement.—June 19. (Also June 26, Nov. 13).
  • Indiana, description of.—June 19.
  • Wolves, bounty on.—June 19.
  • Railroads.—July 3.
  • Church worker in Indiana, letter from.—July 3.
  • Jacob Whetzell, death of and short sketch.—July 3.
  • Indians, the Delawares.—July 17.
  • Morristown, first sale of lots in.—Aug. 21.
  • Vocal music society, meeting in Indianapolis to establish one.—Aug. 28.
  • Educational: Private teaching of grammar (ad.)—Sept. 18.
  • "Muncytown," sale of lots in.—Sept. 18.
  • Imports to Indianapolis (editorial).—Oct. 2.
  • Methodist ministers and stations.—Oct. 2.
  • Indianapolis Academy, "commencement" of.—Oct. 9.
  • Indiana, north boundary of.—Nov. 6. (Also March 27).
  • Indians, attitude toward.—Nov. 6.
  • Public lands, kind of pay accepted for.—Nov. 13.
  • Indianapolis, improvements in.—Nov. 20.
  • Emigration to northern Indiana.—Nov. 20.
  • Lumber, Caleb Scudder's advertisement for 25,000 feet of cherry and poplar.—Dec. 4.
  • Map of Indiana (ad.)—Dec. 4. (Also Jan. 10).


Published by the Indiana University Department of History.