Great Crossings: Indians, Settlers, and Slaves in the Age of Jackson By Christina Snyder

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Steven J. Peach

Abstract

In Great Crossings: Indians, Settlers, and Slaves in the Age of Jackson, Christina Snyder moves beyond standard histories of nineteenth-century American expansion and “begins in the interior of the continent and looks outward to . . . broaden our gaze” (p. 16). Specifically, she examines the Indians, settlers, and slaves who lived in the “experimental community” of Great Crossings near Lexington, Kentucky (p. 4). Named after a nearby eighteenth-century bison ford, Great Crossings featured a mélange of Indians, whites, and blacks who “articulated new visions of the continent’s future” by promoting a shared path of inclusion in the U.S. (p. 4). Collectively, they challenged the “intolerance, exclusion, and racial injustice” that emerged in the 1830s, alerting us to a moment in the antebellum era when the hope for racial coexistence remained possible (p. 317). Snyder retrieves the history of Great Crossings with graceful storytelling.

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How to Cite
Peach, S. (2019). Great Crossings: Indians, Settlers, and Slaves in the Age of Jackson By Christina Snyder. Indiana Magazine of History, 113(4), 342 - 344. Retrieved from https://scholarworks.iu.edu/journals/index.php/imh/article/view/27732
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