A Nation of Neighborhoods: Imagining Cities, Communities, and Democracy in Postwar America By Benjamin Looker

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Robert Beauregard

Abstract

Nations are moral geographies, their identities criss-crossed by spatial divisions. In the United States, a civil war was fought over “Southern” slavery. During the early twentieth century, the burgeoning industrial cities corrupted rural youth, and, through the 1960s, declining cities dragged the now-suburban nation into chaos. The national debates of the time pivoted on place and its meaning. Today, gay residential enclaves, immigrant communities, and the racially-inflected ‘hood undermine a sense that we are “one people,” while muddling what it means to live decently in affluent America.

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Beauregard, R. (2018). A Nation of Neighborhoods: Imagining Cities, Communities, and Democracy in Postwar America By Benjamin Looker. Indiana Magazine of History, 112(3), 275-276. Retrieved from https://scholarworks.iu.edu/journals/index.php/imh/article/view/25503
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