Ty Gwyn: Documenting the Design of a Special School in Wales

Main Article Content

Julie E. N. Irish

Abstract

This design case describes the design process used for the development of new special school facilities for children with severe disabilities in Wales, United Kingdom. The lived experience is described from the interior design practitioner perspective. The background to the design of the school is outlined, and the design process and design changes that were made during the build process are detailed. The main features discussed are the toilet areas, hoist lifting system, the wayfinding and signage system, the hydrotherapy pool, and the wheelchair storage areas. Working relationships with key stakeholders involved in the design process are documented, including the Head Teacher, the staff, students, health professionals, service providers, and suppliers. During the build process, additional examples are provided of positive working arrangements between the project manager and the contractor to resolve design issues. The design case concludes by suggesting that, in this particular case, constant dialogue between all parties involved was a key component of this successful design outcome, in addition to obtaining design input from a variety of sources and flexibility to overcome issues on site.

Article Details

How to Cite
Irish, J. (2013). Ty Gwyn: Documenting the Design of a Special School in Wales. International Journal of Designs for Learning, 4(2). https://doi.org/https://doi.org/10.14434/ijdl.v4i2.3661
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Articles
Author Biography

Julie E. N. Irish, University of Minnesota

Julie E. N. Irish is an interior designer from Wales, United Kingdom, specializing in universal design with a M.Sc. in Inclusive Environments from Reading University, England, United Kingdom.  She is currently aadoctoral student at the University of Minnesota in the Design Program Interior Design Track focusing on evidence-based design. where her research interest is the design of school environments suitable for children with autism spectrum disorder.