Acts of Meaning, Resource Diagrams, and Essential Learning Behaviors: The Design Evolution of Lost & Found

Main Article Content

Owen Gottlieb
Ian Schreiber

Abstract

Lost & Found is a tabletop-to-mobile game series designed for teaching medieval religious legal systems. The long-term goals of the project are to change the discourse around religious laws, such as foregrounding the prosocial aspects of religious law such as collaboration, cooperation, and communal sustainability. This design case focuses on the evolution of the design of the mechanics and core systems in the first two tabletop games in the series, informed by over three and a half years’ worth of design notes, playable prototypes, outside design consultations, internal design reviews, playtests, and interviews.

Downloads

Download data is not yet available.

Article Details

How to Cite
Gottlieb, O., & Schreiber, I. (2020). Acts of Meaning, Resource Diagrams, and Essential Learning Behaviors: The Design Evolution of Lost & Found. International Journal of Designs for Learning, 11(1), 151-164. https://doi.org/10.14434/ijdl.v11i1.24100
Section
Articles
Author Biographies

Owen Gottlieb, Rochester Institute of Technology

Owen Gottlieb is Assistant Professor of Interactive Games & Media at the Rochester Institute of Technology and Founder and Lead Researcher at the Initiative in Religion, Culture, and Policy at the RIT MAGIC Center. His research traverses disciplines including game design, religion, cultural anthropology, learning sciences, media
studies, and communication.

Ian Schreiber, Rochester Institute of Technology

Ian Schreiber is an Assistant Professor of Interactive Games & Media at Rochester Institute of Technology. He is a game designer and game developer who specializes in games for education, core systems design, experimental gameplay, and game balance.