Synchromodal Classes: Designing for Shared Learning Experiences Between Face-to-Face and Online Students

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John Bell Sandra Sawaya William Cain

Abstract

This paper introduces the efforts of the CEPSE/COE Design Studio at Michigan State University to design and implement synchromodal classes for the Educational Psychology and Educational Technology (EPET) Ph.D. program. Synchromodal classes refer to classes in which online and face-to-face students interact during shared synchronous sessions. Our efforts stem from the introduction of a hybrid Ph.D. program in the summer of 2010. In this paper, we describe the antecedents that led to the development of synchromodal classes. We then describe our strategy of a repeated cycle of designing, implementing, and adjusting our realization of synchromodal classes. We conclude by discussing the significance of synchromodal learning in the context of this case and possible future directions for our work. 

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How to Cite
Bell, J., Sawaya, S., & Cain, W. (2014). Synchromodal Classes: Designing for Shared Learning Experiences Between Face-to-Face and Online Students. International Journal of Designs for Learning, 5(1). https://doi.org/https://doi.org/10.14434/ijdl.v5i1.12657
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Articles
Author Biographies

John Bell, Michigan State University

John Bell is an associate professor in the College of Education at Michigan State University and the director of the Design Studio. His research interests include abductive teaching and learning with technology as well as synchromodal (integrated online and face-to-face) classes.

Sandra Sawaya, Michigan State University Doctoral Student

Sandra Sawaya is a doctoral student in the EPET program at Michigan State University and a member of the Design Studio. Her research interests are in adult mobile learning and designing technology-rich learning environments for higher education.   

William Cain, Michigan State University Doctoral Student

William Cain is a doctoral student in the EPET program at Michigan State University and a member of the Design Studio. His research interests focus on disruptive and sustaining educational innovations, tech-rich designs for learning, pedagogy and situational creativity, and mobile augmented reality.