Intercultural Philosophical Wayfaring: An Autobiographical Account in Conversation with a Friend

Main Article Content

Michiko Yusa

Abstract

The formation of the discipline of intercultural philosophy reveals its “karmic aspects,” in which dynamic encounters of scholars and students lay its future courses and clear unexpected paths. What was it like for a Japanese female Junior Year Abroad Exchange student to be in the American academic environment in the early 1970s, and her subsequent experience at the University of California Santa Barbara? A slice of her early memories, as well as her observations regarding the present and future of Japanese philosophy and intercultural philosophy in Japan and in the global context are presented in this essay, in which, while Raimon Panikkar and Ninian Smart figure largely, Nishida Kitarō is also significantly in the picture. The essay is a “conversation” with an invisible interlocutor.

Article Details

How to Cite
Yusa, M. (2018). Intercultural Philosophical Wayfaring: An Autobiographical Account in Conversation with a Friend. Journal of World Philosophies, 3(1), 123-134. Retrieved from https://scholarworks.iu.edu/iupjournals/index.php/jwp/article/view/1620
Section
Philosophical Journeys
Author Biography

Michiko Yusa

Michiko Yusa is a professor of Japanese Thought and Intercultural Philosophy, in the Department of Modern & Classical Languages, Western Washington University, in Bellingham, WA, USA. Most recently, she edited The Bloomsbury Research Handbook of Contemporary Japanese Philosophy (London & New York, 2017).