Speculation as Transformation in Chinese Philosophy: On Speculative Realism, “New” Materialism, and the Study of Li (理) and Qi (氣)

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Leah Kalmanson

Abstract

This article makes the following comparative claims about the contributions of Song- and Ming-dynasty Chinese discourses to recent work in the related fields of new materialism and speculative realism: (1) emerging trends in so-called new materialism can be understood through the Chinese study of qi (氣), which can be translated as “lively material” or “vital stuff”; and (2) the notion of “speculation” as this is used in recent speculative realism can be understood as the study of, engagement with, and ultimate transformation by li (理), a term meaning “principle” or “structure.” However, the focus of the article is as much polemical as it is comparative. By arguing that these contemporary Western movements be categorized by Chinese schools, I challenge and reverse the tendency to subsume non-Western philosophies under Western categories and intervene in the academic practices that continue to define the “new” on Eurocentric models alone.

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How to Cite
Kalmanson, L. (2018). Speculation as Transformation in Chinese Philosophy: On Speculative Realism, “New” Materialism, and the Study of Li (理) and Qi (氣). Journal of World Philosophies, 3(1), 17-30. Retrieved from https://scholarworks.iu.edu/iupjournals/index.php/jwp/article/view/1614
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Articles
Author Biography

Leah Kalmanson

Leah Kalmanson is Associate Professor in the Department of Philosophy and Religion at Drake University (Des Moines, Iowa, USA). Her research areas include Asian philosophies and postcolonial studies. Her articles appear in the journals Comparative and Continental Philosophy, Continental Philosophy Review, Frontiers of Philosophy in China, Hypatia, Philosophy East and West, and Shofar. She has edited multiple collections including, most recently, Ineffability: An Exercise in Comparative Philosophy of Religion (with Tim Knepper, Springer, 2017) and Comparative Studies in Asian and Latin