Ethnic Preferences and Political Quiescence in Malaysia and Singapore

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Date

1997

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M.I.T. Press

Abstract

Few multiethnic, postcolonial states have successfully formulated and implemented policies to stave off violent interethnic conflict. The reasons underlying the shortcomings of public policy in multiethnic states are complex. Significantly, however, the vast majority of these states emerged from colonial rule with weak and poorly developed political institutions. The existence of well-developed political institutions can enable a state to channel, mediate, and limit political demands that the forces of modernization unleash. Robust political institutions do not, of course, guarantee ethnic peace. Institutions, unless maintained, can decline and lose their utility.

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Citation

“Ethnic Preferences and Political Quiescence in Malaysia,” in Michael E. Brown and Šumit Ganguly, eds., Government Policies and Ethnic Relations in Asia and the Pacific. M.I.T. Press, 1997.

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Book chapter