Spectral analysis of target-appropriate /t/ and /k/ produced by phonologically disordered and normally articulating children

dc.contributor.authorForrest, Karenen
dc.contributor.authorWeismer, Garyen
dc.contributor.authorElbert, Maryen
dc.contributor.authorDinnsen, Daniel A.en
dc.date.accessioned2015-06-23T19:36:31Zen
dc.date.available2015-06-23T19:36:31Zen
dc.date.issued1994en
dc.description.abstractPrevious research (Forrest, Weismer, Hodge, Dinnsen and Elbert, 1990) has shown that some phonologically disordered children differentially mark seemingly homophonous phonemes; however, the resulting contrast may be spectrally distinct from that produced by normally articulating children of the same age. In the present investigation possible sources for these differences between normally articulating and phonologically disordered children's productions of target-appropriate phonemes were pursued. Spectral characteristics of seemingly correct productions of /t/ and /k/ in word-initial position were analysed for four normally articulating and seven phonologically disordered children to assess the effect of recency of acquisition, depth of knowledge of the contrast and/or the effect of a phonological disorder on accuracy and variability of production. Results revealed that children who had acquired the velar-alveolar contrast more recently, and who had incomplete knowledge of that contrast, produced target-appropriate /t/ and /k/ differently from their normally articulating peers and other phonologically disordered children with greater knowledge of the contrast. Further, the phonologically disordered children with incomplete knowledge of the velar-alveolar contrast were less variable than the other phonologically disordered or normally articulating children in the spectral characteristics across repeated productions. Analysis of the spectral characteristics of word-initial /t/ and /k/ at a later point in time indicated similarities between all speaker groups in the spectral parameters that distinguished the velar from the alveolar stop. However, the stability of these parameters across repeated productions decreased for the phonologically disordered children with greater knowledge of the contrast. These effects are related to motor skill development and found to be consistent with previously demonstrated patterns of skill acquisition.en
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Institutes of Health DC00433, RR7031K, DC00076, DC001694 (PI: Gierut)en
dc.description.versionThis is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Clinical Linguistics & Phonetics on January 1994, available online: http://wwww.tandfonline.com/10.3109/02699209408985312.en
dc.identifier.citationForrest, K., Weismer, G., Elbert M., & Dinnsen, D. A. (1994). Spectral analysis of target-appropriate /t/ and /k/ produced by phonologically disordered and normally articulating children. Clinical Linguistics & Phonetics, 8(4), 267-281. PMID: 22320893en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2022/20211
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherTaylor & Francis Health Sciencesen
dc.relation.isversionofhttps://doi.org/10.3109/02699209408985312en
dc.rights© 1994 Taylor & Francis Ltd.en
dc.subjectphonologyen
dc.subjectchild phonologyen
dc.subjectclinical phonologyen
dc.subjectphonological disorders in childrenen
dc.subjectphonological treatmenten
dc.subjectLearnability Projecten
dc.subjectlanguage acquisitionen
dc.titleSpectral analysis of target-appropriate /t/ and /k/ produced by phonologically disordered and normally articulating childrenen
dc.typeArticleen

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