How to meet the neighbors: Modality effects on phonological generalization

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Date
2014
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Volume Title
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Taylor & Francis
Abstract
Long-term auditory priming of words from dense neighborhoods has been posited as a learning mechanism that affects change in the phonological structure of children’s lexical representations. An apparent confound associated with the modality of priming responsible for structural change has been introduced in the literature, which challenges this proposal. Thus, our purpose was to evaluate prime modality in treatment of children with phonological delay. Nine children were assigned to auditory-visual, auditory or visual priming of words from dense neighborhoods prior to treatment of production as the independent variable. The dependent variable was phonological generalization. Results showed that auditory priming (with or without visual input) promoted greater generalization on an order of magnitude of 3:1. Findings support the theoretical significance of auditory priming for phonological learning and demonstrate the applied utility of priming in clinical treatment.
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Keywords
phonology, child phonology, clinical phonology, phonological disorders in children, phonological treatment, Learnability Project, language acquisition
Citation
Gierut, J. A., & Morrisette, M. L. (2014). How to meet the neighbors: Modality effects on phonological generalization. Clinical Linguistics & Phonetics, 28, 477-492. PMCID: PMC4676943
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© 2014 Taylor & Francis
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Article
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