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dc.contributor.author Mace, Casey
dc.date.accessioned 2010-01-15T21:49:37Z
dc.date.available 2010-01-15T21:49:37Z
dc.date.issued 2009-12
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2022/6678
dc.description.abstract The use of online social networking continues to increase among Americans, yet there is little research related to understanding of the behavior using online social networks. This study aimed to understand the underlying beliefs, evaluations, attitudes, norms, and perceptions behind the intention to log onto online social networks. The Theory of Planned Behavior was applied to the behavioral intention to log onto Facebook once a day for the next three months (n = 269). Regression analysis predicting intention from global constructs of the Theory of Planned Behavior yielded a multiple correlation of 0.62 with attitude (β = 0.32, p < 0.01), subjective norm (β = 0.41, p < 0.01), and perceived behavioral control (β = 0.08, ns). Salient consequences related to stronger intention to log onto Facebook once a day for the next three months included the behavioral beliefs of staying in touch, increasing social network, and sharing interests with others. Salient referents that were significantly correlated with intention to log onto Facebook once a day for the next three months included friends, other students, boyfriend/girlfriend/spouse, family, professors, and future employers. Implications for understanding the intention behind the use of online social networks will be discussed in regards to the salient referents and consequences of logging onto Facebook once a day for the next three months. en
dc.description.sponsorship Submitted to the faculty of the University Graduate School in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree Master of Public Health in the Department of Applied Health Science of the School of HPER, Indiana University December 2009 en
dc.language.iso en_US en
dc.title Psychosocial Determinants Of Using Online Social Networks: An Application Of The Theory Of Planned Behavior en
dc.type Thesis en


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