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dc.contributor.author Smith, Moira
dc.date.accessioned 2009-10-30T11:27:21Z
dc.date.available 2009-10-30T11:27:21Z
dc.date.issued 2009-10-24
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2022/3855
dc.description Paper presented at the American Folklore Society 2009 Annual Meeting. en
dc.description.abstract Elliott Oring once stated that some jokes are beautiful— a statement that at first blush seems either absurd or revolutionary. But if it seems revolutionary to apply aesthetic approaches to verbal jokes, practical jokes are even more low class. Nevertheless, practical jokes, too, can be beautiful, and people regularly evaluate them in terms that go beyond questions of amusement or appropriateness. Aesthetics and personal style are also at work. Style in practical joking is not simply the product of personality and circumstance, but is the result of conscious aesthetic choices by the joker. I will introduce a case study of two practical jokers I have met, comparing their different practical joke styles and the role that these jokes play in their lives. en
dc.language.iso en_US en
dc.rights This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 Unported License. en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/ en
dc.subject Aesthetics en
dc.subject Practical Jokes en
dc.subject Humor en
dc.title The Art of the Practical Joke en
dc.type Presentation en


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