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dc.contributor.author Stoeltje, Beverly J.
dc.date.accessioned 2009-02-02T15:32:10Z
dc.date.available 2009-02-02T15:32:10Z
dc.date.issued 2003
dc.identifier.citation Stoeltje, Beverly J. (2003) "Asante Queen Mothers: Precolonial Authority in a Postcolonial Society." Research Review NS 19(2): 1-19. en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2022/3339
dc.description.abstract While the Asantehene and Asantehemmaa are well known figures in Ghana, less familiar are the many queen mothers who function in parallel roles to chiefs in every Asante town and paramountcy. Ignored by the British and generally bypassed by modern Ghanaian leaders, queen mothers have nevertheless continued to serve their constituencies faithfully. More recently, however, globalization has discovered them, and external sources are beginning to seek them out for local projects. Yet, queen mothers continue to face serious obstacles as a precolonial female authority in a postcolonial society. en
dc.format.extent 4722132 bytes
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language.iso en_US en
dc.publisher Institute of African Studies of the University of Ghana, Legon en
dc.rights This material is the copyright of the Institute of African Studies of the University of Ghana, Legon. Please contact the Institute for information about reproduction or reuse. en
dc.rights.uri http://www.ug.edu.gh en
dc.subject Ghana, Asante (African people), politics, leadership, women, social conditions en
dc.title Asante Queen Mothers: Precolonial Authority in a Postcolonial Society en
dc.type Article en


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