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dc.contributor.author McDowell, John H.
dc.date.accessioned 2020-01-22T16:29:08Z
dc.date.available 2020-01-22T16:29:08Z
dc.date.issued 1980
dc.identifier.citation McDowell, John H. "Animal Categories in Chicano Children's Spooky Stories," (1980) in Nickolai Burlakoff and Carl Lindahl (ed.), Folklore on Two Continents: Essays in Honor of Linda Degh. Bloomington: Trickster Press, pp. 169-175. en
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/2022/25055
dc.description.abstract The thesis to be advanced in this essay is that two common genres of folk expression, riddle and narrative, carve out distinct reaIms of experience for artistic representation, and that they treat these separate realms in contrastive fashion. Specifically, riddles focus on the familiar domains of experience and render them strange, while spooky stories focus on the strange to render it more familiar. Finally, this differential usage of experience impIies an underIying folk cosmology. en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Trickster Press en
dc.relation.isversionof https://scholarworks.iu.edu/dspace/handle/2022/3774 en
dc.title Animal Categories in Chicano Children's Spooky Stories en
dc.type Book chapter en


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