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dc.contributor.author Chen, P. D.
dc.contributor.author Kuh, G. D.
dc.contributor.author Gonyea, R. M.
dc.date.accessioned 2019-09-18T20:23:14Z
dc.date.available 2019-09-18T20:23:14Z
dc.date.issued 2008-03-01
dc.identifier.citation Chen, Pu-Shih Daniel; Gonyea, Robert; and Kuh, George (2008) "Learning at a Distance: Engaged or Not? ," Innovate: Journal of Online Education: Vol. 4 : Iss. 3 , Article 3. Available at: https://nsuworks.nova.edu/innovate/vol4/iss3/3
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/2022/24106
dc.description.abstract Distance learning is the fastest growing segment of postsecondary education. Almost 3 million students took at least one online course in fall 2005, an increase of more than 800,000 over the previous year (Allen and Seaman 2006). At the same time, questions persist about the quality of online learning. In one recent study, about two-fifths of senior academic officers at U.S. degree-granting higher education institutions expressed a belief that distance learning is inferior to face-to-face learning (Allen and Seaman 2006). Although some studies show that distance education learners benefit from their experiences to the same degree as campus-based learners (Dutton, Dutton, and Perry 2002; Neuhauser 2002), most of the work demonstrating positive outcomes in distance learning has focused on older students, who are often more motivated and have the self-discipline to manage effectively the unstructured nature of the distance learning environment (Dibiase 2000; Hardy and Boaz 1997).
dc.publisher Innovate: Journal of Online Education
dc.rights.uri https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.title Learning at a distance: Engaged or not?
dc.type Article


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