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dc.contributor.author Imhoff, Sarah
dc.date.accessioned 2018-01-11T19:02:21Z
dc.date.available 2018-01-11T19:02:21Z
dc.date.issued 2017
dc.identifier.citation Lineage Matters: DNA, Race, and Gene Talk in Judaism and Messianic Judaism Sarah Imhoff, Hillary Kaell. Religion and American Culture: A Journal of Interpretation, Vol. 27 No. 1, Winter 2017; (pp. 95-127) DOI: 10.1525/rac.2017.27.1.95. en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2022/21870
dc.description Postprint article en
dc.description.abstract Based on ethnographic and archival research conducted on North American Judaism and Messianic Judaism, this article argues that each group uses DNA in what appear to be sociologically similar ways but that actually differ profoundly at the theological level. Our analysis moves beyond DNA testing per se to focus on what anthropologist Kim Tallbear calls “gene talk,” referring to “the idea that essential truths about identity inhere in sequences of DNA.” Contrasting Jews and Messianic Jews, we demonstrate clearly what scholars have only begun to recognize: how theological commitments may drive investments in genetic science and interpretations of it. Further, we show how religiously significant identities associated with race, ethnicity, or lineage interact with DNA science, coming to be viewed as inalienable qualities that reside in the self but move beyond phenotype alone. Finally, we argue that gene talk in these contexts is a religiously inflected practice, which serves to binds communities and (implicitly or explicitly) authorize existing theological ideals. en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Published as Lineage Matters: DNA, Race, and Gene Talk in Judaism and Messianic Judaism Sarah Imhoff, Hillary Kaell. Religion and American Culture: A Journal of Interpretation, Vol. 27 No. 1, Winter 2017; (pp. 95-127) DOI: 10.1525/rac.2017.27.1.95. © 2017 by the Regents of the University of California. Copying and permissions notice: Authorization to copy this content beyond fair use (as specified in Sections 107 and 108 of the U. S. Copyright Law) for internal or personal use, or the internal or personal use of specific clients, is granted by the Regents of the University of California for libraries and other users, provided that they are registered with and pay the specified fee via Rightslink® or directly with the Copyright Clearance Center. en
dc.relation.isversionof https://doi.org/10.1525/rac.2017.27.1.95 en
dc.subject race en
dc.subject Messianic Judaism en
dc.subject Judaism en
dc.subject genetics en
dc.subject science en
dc.subject identity en
dc.title Lineage Matters: DNA, Race, and Gene Talk in Judaism and Messianic Judaism en
dc.type Article en


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