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dc.contributor.author Hofstadter, Douglas R.
dc.date.accessioned 2017-10-13T19:35:16Z
dc.date.available 2017-10-13T19:35:16Z
dc.date.issued 1997
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2022/21744
dc.description In the fall of 1997, Indiana University cognitive scientist Douglas Hofstadter, in his role as Visiting Professor at Stanford University’s Center for Computer-Aided Research in the Humanities (CCARH), organized a series of five public symposia centered on the burning question “Are Computers Approaching Human-Level Creativity?” The first symposium was about humans versus computers as chess players and as Go players (at that time, world chess champion Garry Kasparov had just been defeated by IBM’s Deep Blue system, a very provocative result). To view part 1 click on the link below. en
dc.description.abstract This first symposium was about humans versus computers as chess players and as Go players (at that time, world chess champion Garry Kasparov had just been defeated by IBM’s Deep Blue system, a very provocative result). en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Stanford Channel (Television station : Stanford, Calif.) en
dc.relation.ispartofseries Are Computers Approaching Human-Level Creativity?; 1 of 15
dc.relation.uri https://purl.dlib.indiana.edu/iudl/media/673108wd20
dc.subject Artificial intelligence en
dc.subject Cognition en
dc.subject Cognitive Science en
dc.title Chess and Go Part 1 en
dc.type Video en


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