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dc.contributor.author Szwed, John en
dc.contributor.author Spitzer, Nick en
dc.date.accessioned 2016-07-28T14:29:42Z en
dc.date.available 2016-07-28T14:29:42Z en
dc.date.issued 2015-10-16 en
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/2022/20931 en
dc.description.abstract Folk songs have been at the heart of the study of folklore since its beginnings, and the scholarship on song is one of the finest achievements of the field. But in recent years interest in songs, especially songs in English, has waned among scholars in both folklore and ethnomusicology. Despite some continuing important and innovative work, and public fascination with the subject, song no longer seems central to folklore studies. I will argue that song is a cultural universal, indeed a cultural imperative, and exists as a system similar to kinship systems, language, and economic relations. This will be a plea to resume interest in songs, and will suggest some means by which folklore studies might again assume responsibility for understanding the role of song in human history. en
dc.description.sponsorship Sponsored by the AFS Fellows. en
dc.language.iso en_US en
dc.publisher American Folklore Society en
dc.relation.isversionof Click on the PURL link below in the "External Files" section to play this video. en
dc.relation.uri http://purl.dlib.indiana.edu/iudl/media/4558419g01 en
dc.title What Ever Happened to Folk Songs? en
dc.title.alternative Francis Lee Utley Memorial Lecture en
dc.type Presentation en


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