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dc.contributor.author Wilhite, Daniel
dc.date.accessioned 2015-09-15T20:54:19Z
dc.date.available 2015-09-15T20:54:19Z
dc.date.issued 2010-08
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2022/20374
dc.description.abstract There is an upper limitation to the flow rates achievable during exhalation. Once this limitation is reached (expiratory flow limitation; FLexp), such as that observed during intensive exercise, no further increase in expiratory flow is possible. During heavy to maximal exercise, a major consequence of FLexp may be an increased oxygen cost of breathing. To examine the effect of FLexp on respiratory muscle oxygen consumption (VO2RM) during maximal exercise, a sample of highly-trained male distance runners (n=18; O2 max = 74.28 ml·kg-1·min-1) completed an incremental exercise test to exhaustion on a treadmill. Based on flow-volume loop analysis, subjects were separated into two groups, flow-limited (FL) and non-flow limited (NFL). During a second visit, runners performed three separate trials of voluntary hyperpnea, matching exercise ventilation ( E) at 80%, 90%, and 100% of maximal exercise while standing on the treadmill. Respiratory muscle O2 consumption (VO2RM) was estimated during each voluntary hyperpnea trial. A one-tailed, independent samples t-test detected a significantly greater VO2RM in FL compared to NFL (P = 0.043). E at O2 max was also greater in FL vs. NFL (P = 0.029). No differences were found between expiratory reserve volume (ERV), tidal volume (VT), or breathing frequency (fb) during maximal exercise. When co-varying for E at O2 max, there was no significant difference in VO2RM between groups, suggesting that the greater oxygen cost of breathing in flow-limited individuals is a consequence of the greater VE and not due to differences in breathing mechanics associated with flow limitation. en
dc.description.sponsorship Submitted to the faculty of the University Graduate School in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree Master of Science in the Department of Kinesiology Indiana University August 12, 2010 en
dc.language.iso en_US en
dc.title THE ROLE OF EXPIRATORY FLOW LIMITATION IN THE OXYGEN COST OF EXERCISE HYPERPNEA IN HIGHLY-TRAINED DISTANCE RUNNERS en
dc.type Thesis en
dc.altmetrics.display false en


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