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dc.contributor.author Balthaser, Benjamin
dc.date.accessioned 2015-05-19T20:22:54Z
dc.date.available 2015-05-19T20:22:54Z
dc.date.issued 2012
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2022/19967
dc.description.abstract Scenes from Richard Wright's Native Son (1940) could be read as pointed satire of the documentary aesthetic, and easily be taken as Wright's final statement on the 1930s radical documentary. Balthaser argues that 12 Million Black Voices (1941) -- Richard Wright's documentary photo-montage of the Great Migration -- is "not merely the nonfiction companion to Native Son as it was advertised, but rather the culmination of Wright's own contradictory and dialectical concerns with the politics of black representation." en
dc.publisher Criticism en
dc.relation.isversionof http://digitalcommons.wayne.edu/criticism/vol55/iss3/1/ en
dc.subject American literature--African American authors--History and criticism. en
dc.subject American literature--20th century--History and criticism. en
dc.subject Wright, Richard, 1908-1960. en
dc.subject Documentary photography en
dc.subject Documentary mass media and the arts en
dc.title Killing the documentarian: Richard Wright and documentary modernity en
dc.type Article en
dc.altmetrics.display true en


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