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dc.contributor.author Ketterson, Ellen D. en
dc.contributor.author Nolan, Val Jr en
dc.contributor.author Wolf, Licia en
dc.contributor.author Ziegenfus, Charles en
dc.date.accessioned 2014-02-21T19:33:16Z en
dc.date.available 2014-02-21T19:33:16Z en
dc.date.issued 1992-12 en
dc.identifier.citation Testosterone and Avian Life Histories: Effects of Experimentally Elevated Testosterone on Behavior and Correlates of Fitness in the Dark-Eyed Junco (Junco hyemalis) Ellen D. Ketterson, Val Nolan Jr., Licia Wolf and Charles Ziegenfus. The American Naturalist , Vol. 140, No. 6 (Dec., 1992) , pp. 980-999. Published by: The University of Chicago Press for The American Society of Naturalists. Article Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2462929 en
dc.identifier.uri http://www.jstor.org/stable/2462929 en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2022/17323 en
dc.description.abstract Hormones influence many aspects of organismal behavior, physiology, and morphol- ogy, and thus hormones may lie at the root of many life-history trade-offs. By manipulating hormones we can create novel phenotypes (i.e., perform phenotypic engineering) and attempt to relate phenotypic variation to fitness. We report the effect of testosterone treatment on parental behavior and vocal behavior of adult male dark-eyed juncos. Testosterone partially suppressed paternal behavior and increased the frequency of song. When we compared treated males and controls for nine potential correlates of fitness (offspring growth and survival to the age of 10 d, condition of females, length of the interval between consecutive nestings, size of subsequent clutches and broods, mate retention within and between breeding seasons, and survival rate), we found no statistical differences. In some measures treated males outperformed controls, but in most the reverse was true. The power of some of our tests was not great enough to detect small differences. At this stage of our investigation, three interpretations of our results seem almost equally probable: (1) a broad range of behavioral phenotypes is selectively neutral in the junco, (2) male parental behavior is beneficial to males only in some years or habitats, or (3) we have yet to measure the correlates of fitness that are most strongly affected by the behavioral changes induced by elevated testosterone en
dc.language.iso en_US en
dc.publisher American Society of Naturalists en
dc.rights CC-BY-NC-SA. By downloading this document or using any information contained therein, you agree to the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike (CC BY-NC-SA) license terms, which explain terms governing use, creation of derivative research, and requirements for citing the document. en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/us/ en
dc.title Testosterone and Avian Life Histories: Effects of Experimentally Elevated Testosterone on Behavior and Correlates of Fitness in the Dark-Eyed Junco (Junco hyemalis) en
dc.type Article en
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