Show simple item record Peterson, Mark P. Rosvall, Kimberly A. Choi, Jeong-Hyeon Ziegenfus, Charles Tang, Haixu Colbourne, John K. Ketterson, Ellen D. 2013-10-01T15:50:10Z 2013-10-01T15:50:10Z 2013-04-16
dc.identifier.citation Peterson MP, Rosvall KA, Choi J-H, Ziegenfus C, Tang H, et al. (2013) Testosterone Affects Neural Gene Expression Differently in Male and Female Juncos: A Role for Hormones in Mediating Sexual Dimorphism and Conflict. PLoS ONE 8(4): e61784. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0061784 en_US
dc.identifier.uri en_US
dc.description.abstract Despite sharing much of their genomes, males and females are often highly dimorphic, reflecting at least in part the resolution of sexual conflict in response to sexually antagonistic selection. Sexual dimorphism arises owing to sex differences in gene expression, and steroid hormones are often invoked as a proximate cause of sexual dimorphism. Experimental elevation of androgens can modify behavior, physiology, and gene expression, but knowledge of the role of hormones remains incomplete, including how the sexes differ in gene expression in response to hormones. We addressed these questions in a bird species with a long history of behavioral endocrinological and ecological study, the dark-eyed junco (Junco hyemalis), using a custom microarray. Focusing on two brain regions involved in sexually dimorphic behavior and regulation of hormone secretion, we identified 651 genes that differed in expression by sex in medial amygdala and 611 in hypothalamus. Additionally, we treated individuals of each sex with testosterone implants and identified many genes that may be related to previously identified phenotypic effects of testosterone treatment. Some of these genes relate to previously identified effects of testosterone-treatment and suggest that the multiple effects of testosterone may be mediated by modifying the expression of a small number of genes. Notably, testosterone-treatment tended to alter expression of different genes in each sex: only 4 of the 527 genes identified as significant in one sex or the other were significantly differentially expressed in both sexes. Hormonally regulated gene expression is a key mechanism underlying sexual dimorphism, and our study identifies specific genes that may mediate some of these processes. en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher PLOS One en_US
dc.rights CC-BY-NC-SA
dc.rights By downloading this document or using any information contained therein, you agree to the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike (CC BY-NC-SA) license terms, which explain terms governing use, creation of derivative research, and requirements for citing the document.
dc.title Testosterone Affects Neural Gene Expression Differently in Male and Female Juncos: A Role for Hormones in Mediating Sexual Dimorphism and Conflict en_US
dc.type Article en_US
dc.identifier.doi 10.1371

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