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dc.contributor.author Ekbia, Hamid
dc.contributor.author Kling, Rob
dc.date.accessioned 2006-06-10T15:26:06Z
dc.date.available 2006-06-10T15:26:06Z
dc.date.issued 2003
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2022/164
dc.description.abstract Knowledge management was advanced in the early 1990’s as a new managerial reform suited to the rapidly changing and globally vast business environment. These reformers encouraged managers to treat as a critical source their employees’ knowledge, of which they themselves had minimally articulated and varying conceptions. The major common feature among these conceptions was their generally cognitive, epistemological, and often individualistic approach to the question of knowledge, which dispossesses them of other important issues, most notably “power.” Adopting a sociological approach in this paper, will reexamine issues of knowledge management, especially as they relate to power relationships inside and outside organizations. We apply a refined version of Foucault’s notion of a “regime of truth” to show the institutionally-specific processes, procedures, and mechanisms that are usually at work in the creation of statements about the social world that function as true. As examples, we distinguish three regimes of truth that, we argue, are at work in the functioning of publicly traded businesses in the U.S. — the financial reporting, analysts’ research, and business press regimes of truth. A brief look at knowledge-management literature will further manifest a fourth regime of scholarly research. The close examination of these multiple regimes will lead us to the overall conclusion that power relationships can systematically influence the statements about the social world that function as true. In the latter part of the paper, we will study the implications of this observation for the theory and practice of knowledge management. en
dc.description.sponsorship Indiana University en
dc.format.extent 73916 bytes
dc.format.extent 10176 bytes
dc.format.mimetype text/html
dc.format.mimetype image/jpeg
dc.language.iso en_US en
dc.publisher Rob Kling Center for Social Informatics en
dc.relation.ispartofseries WP-03-02 en
dc.rights Creative Commons license en
dc.subject social informatics en
dc.subject knowledge management en
dc.subject foucault en
dc.subject regime of truth en
dc.subject scholarly publishing en
dc.title Power Issues in Knowledge Management en
dc.type Working Paper en


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