Browsing Circulars - Indiana Geol. Survey by Subject "Indiana"

Sort by: Order: Results:

  • Shaver, Robert H. (Indiana Geological Survey, 1959-06)
    Many laymen write to the Indiana Geological Survey and ask: “Please send me books and maps on fossils and where they can be found.” Some write on tablet paper in the labored fifth-grade hand of a school child; others write ...
  • Smith, Ned M.; Brookley, Arthur C.; McGregor, Duncan J. (Indiana Geological Survey, 1954)
    Rocks, minerals, and fossils of Indiana are the foundation, directly or indirectly, of the economic well-being of the state. Utilization of rocks, minerals, and fossils has contributed to the development of civilization. ...
  • Perry, Thomas G. (Indiana Geological Survey, 1959)
    Fossils are abundant in Indiana’s rocks, and Hoosiers commonly seek information about these relics of ancient life from the Indiana Geological Survey. The primary purpose of this circular is to provide information on the ...
  • Deiss, Charles F. (Indiana Geological Survey, 1952)
    This publication could also be titled “Sources of aggregates and types of highway subgrades in Indiana.” Our highways are built of aggregates cemented together with one kind or another of portland cement, bituminous ...
  • Greenberg, Seymour S.; Bundy, Wayne M.; McGregor, Duncan J. (Indiana Geological Survey, 1958)
    The study of minerals and rocks is an important part of the science of geology, which treats of the history of the earth and its life, especially as recorded in the rocks. Surprisingly many of us accept as commonplace many ...
  • Wier, Charles E.; Wayne, William J. (Indiana Geological Survey, 1953)
    Parke County, which is located about 50 miles west of Indianapolis, has an area of 447 square miles. It is bounded on the north by Fountain County, on the northeast by Montgomery County, on the east by Putnam County, on ...
  • Wayne, William J. (Indiana Geological Survey, 1958)
    Rocks are made up of a mixture of minerals. Therefore you need to know what minerals and how much of each mineral are in a rock before you can give that rock a name. This has been an obstacle for the student of nature ...

Search IUScholarWorks


Advanced Search

Browse

My Account