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"Qâla al-Samaw'al ibn ¿Âdiyâ al-yahudiyy (The Jew, Al-Samaw'al Son-of ¿Âdiya Said: ... )" Conscientiousness and Fidelity as Heroic Qualities in Arab Traditions (The Jewish Example)

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dc.contributor.author El-Shamy, Hasan
dc.date.accessioned 2012-01-26T19:27:52Z
dc.date.available 2012-01-26T19:27:52Z
dc.date.issued 2012
dc.identifier.citation El-Shamy, Hasan (2012). "Qâla al-Samaw'al ibn ¿Âdiyâ al-yahudiyy (The Jew, Al-Samaw'al Son-of ¿Âdiyâ Said: ... )" Conscientiousness and Fidelity as Heroic Qualities in Arab Traditions (The Jewish Example). Folk Culture 5(16); 6-23 (English text); 20-39 (Arabic text). en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2022/14138
dc.identifier.uri http://www.folkculturebh.org/en/index.php?issue=16&page=showarticle&id=145 en
dc.description Published in English and Arabic in: Folk Culture/~/ iJ~I, Vol. 5, No. 16 (Manama, Bahrain: Winter 2012), pp. 6-23 (English text); pp. 20-39 (Arabic text). Posted here by permission of the Journal's Editor in Chief. en
dc.description.abstract Willingness to sacrifice one's own son for a sacred or noble cause is an established tradition in Semitic value systems. The most celebrated case within the sacred context is that of Patriarch Abraham and his son (Ismael/Isaac), while the example in the non-sacred context is that of the Arab chieftain al-Samaw'al "the Jew" and his son. In the latter case, the act of "sacrifice" is euphemistic. In both contexts, the consequences of actions by both patriarchs have constituted "shared" and far-reaching traditions among Jews, Christians, and Moslems. 2 This study treats the information related to al-Samaw'al in Arab sources as cultural phenomena rather than verified historical facts. The "Discussant" assigned by the symposium commented on this paper with one sentence: it treats al-Samaw'al as "the other" (that is: he is not a member of the society as a whole). However, in this regard we should remember that in the tribal Arab society, any person who did not belong to one's own blood-group (i.e., tribe) was "the other". It is in this sense that Samaw'al was viewed--in the same manner as Antar, Imru' al-Qays, al-'A¿shâ, etc.--and esteemed as noble "Arab" in spite of being "the other". The crux of discussion in the present paper, and the reason for holding this symposium is to explore what each of the three religions shares with "the other". If the quality of the "otherness" is negated by exclusion, then the essence of the foundation of this symposium is negated as well. en
dc.publisher Folk Culture - Bahrain en
dc.title "Qâla al-Samaw'al ibn ¿Âdiyâ al-yahudiyy (The Jew, Al-Samaw'al Son-of ¿Âdiya Said: ... )" Conscientiousness and Fidelity as Heroic Qualities in Arab Traditions (The Jewish Example) en
dc.type Article en


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