Alkali feldspar dissolution and secondary mineral precipitation in batch systems: 3. Saturation states of product minerals and reaction paths

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dc.contributor.author Lu, Peng
dc.contributor.author Zhu, Chen
dc.date.accessioned 2011-12-18T00:59:45Z
dc.date.available 2011-12-18T00:59:45Z
dc.date.issued 2009-03-26
dc.identifier.citation Zhu, C., and Lu, P., Alkali Feldspar Dissolution and Secondary Mineral Precipitation in Batch Systems: 3. Saturation States of Product Minerals and Reaction Paths. Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta 73 (2009) 3171–3200. doi: 10.1016/j.gca.2009.03.015. en
dc.identifier.uri http://www.sciencedirect.com.ezproxy.lib.indiana.edu/science/article/pii/S0016703709001586 en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2022/13978
dc.description.abstract In order to evaluate the complex interplay between dissolution and precipitation reaction kinetics, we examined the hypothesis of partial equilibria between secondary mineral products and aqueous solutions in feldspar–water systems. Speciation and solubility geochemical modeling was used to compute the saturation indices (SI) for product minerals in batch feldspar dissolution experiments at elevated temperatures and pressures and to trace the reaction paths on activity–activity diagrams. The modeling results demonstrated: (1) the experimental aqueous solutions were supersaturated with respect to product minerals for almost the entire duration of the experiments; (2) the aqueous solution chemistry did not evolve along the phase boundaries but crossed the phase boundaries at oblique angles; and (3) the earlier precipitated product minerals did not dissolve but continued to precipitate even after the solution chemistry had evolved into the stability fields of minerals lower in the paragenesis sequence. These three lines of evidence signify that product mineral precipitation is a slow kinetic process and partial equilibria between aqueous solution and product minerals were not held. In contrast, the experimental evidences are consistent with the hypothesis of strong coupling of mineral dissolution/precipitation kinetics [e.g., Zhu C., Blum A. E. and Veblen D. R. (2004a) Feldspar dissolution rates and clay precipitation in the Navajo aquifer at Black Mesa, Arizona, USA. In Water–Rock Interaction (eds. R. B. Wanty and R. R. I. Seal). A.A. Balkema, Saratoga Springs, New York. pp. 895–899]. In all batch experiments examined, the time of congruent feldspar dissolution was short and supersaturation with respect to the product minerals was reached within a short period of time. The experimental system progressed from a dissolution driven regime to a precipitation limited regime in a short order. The results of this study suggest a complex feedback between dissolution and precipitation reaction kinetics, which needs to be considered in the interpretation of field based dissolution rates. en
dc.language.iso en_US en
dc.publisher Elsevier en
dc.rights Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. en
dc.title Alkali feldspar dissolution and secondary mineral precipitation in batch systems: 3. Saturation states of product minerals and reaction paths en
dc.type Article en

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