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    Liji, chapters 3-4: "Tan Gong": Translation, Notes, and Commentary
    (2016) Eno, Robert
    The two "Tan Gong" chapters of the Confucian canonical text, Liji (Records of Ritual), are a repository of anecdotal lore concerning Confucius and his circle as well as of ritual rules and performance guides. This technical translation provides lexical glosses, philological and text critical notes, critical assessments of traditional and modern commentarial sources, and an analysis of the process of textual creation that resulted in this hybrid text. The intended audience is field specialists and advanced students.
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    Zigong and the Identity of the Yan and Meng Schools
    (2007-04) Eno, Robert
    This 2007 working paper (with material added in 2023) explores the role of the Confucian disciple Zigong in early texts and the historical profile of Zigong derived from them. Although not the most prominent of Confucius's disciples, the paper notes Zigong's pervasive textual presence, the unusual role he plays in some texts, and his unique political and cultural profile in considering how the historical Zigong may have become a pivotal figure in the emergence of competing lineages of early Confucian thought. The analysis relies upon core texts, such as the Lunyu and Zuozhuan, as well as some excavated Warring States texts first transcribed and published in the 21st century.
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    The Confucian Creation of Heaven: Philosophy and the Defense of Ritual Mastery, Digital version
    (SUNY Press, 1990) Eno, Robert
    This is a digital version of the 1990 book, The Confucian Creation of Heaven, published by SUNY Press, incorporating pinyin transcription for Chinese, rather than the original Wade-Giles. The book examines the way core early Confucian (or "Ruist") texts treat the concept of Tian (Heaven), in order to elucidate the social and philosophical orientation of the early Confucian community. The central theme of the book is that the coherence of early Confucianism emerges only when doctrine is viewed as a function of the unique ritual practices of the early Confucian community.
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    Confucius's disciple Zigong and the history of early Ruism [In Chinese, with English abstract]
    (National Taiwan University, 2011) Eno, Robert
    In the fifth volume of the Shanghai Museum collection of recovered Warring States era bamboo manuscripts there are two items that include speech attributed to Kongzi’s (Confucius’s) disciple Zigong. If we compare these texts to typical passages concerning Zigong in the ${Lunyu}$, we see similar features, suggesting that these texts and the ${Lunyu}$ arise from a common tradition within the early Ruist movement, one distinct from traditions associated with the teachings of the disciples Zeng Shen and Zisi. It appears possible that these manuscript materials reflect the earliest split within Ruism, and show that initially two competing factions formed, the pivotal figure in this divide being Zigong, a disciple revered in the traditions of both factions.
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    From Teachers to Texts: Confucian Collaborationism and Qin Encyclopaedism
    (1997) Eno, Robert
    This working paper outlines a revisionist portrait of the role of Confucians duing the Qin and very early Han Dynasties. Its principal thesis is that Confucianism was patronized by the Qin court, rather than persecuted, resulting in the compilation of a number a canonical anothologies traditionally viewed as pre-Qin works. The destruction of the Qin palace archives during the civil war transition to the Han, along with anti-Confucian policies at the court of the initial Han emperors, accounts for the loss of many "classical era" texts that is usually attributed to Qin tyranny.
  • Item
    Liji, chapters 3-4: "Tan Gong": Translation, Notes, and Commentary
    (2016) Eno, Robert
    The two "Tan Gong" chapters of the Confucian canonical text, Liji (Records of Ritual), are a repository of anecdotal lore concerning Confucius and his circle as well as of ritual rules and performance guides. This technical translation provides lexical glosses, philological and text critical notes, critical assessments of traditional and modern commentarial sources, and an analysis of the process of textual creation that resulted in this hybrid text. The intended audience is field specialists and advanced students.
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    The Great Learning and The Doctrine of the Mean: Translation, Commentary, and Notes
    (2016) Eno, Robert
    Along with the Analects and Mencius, the Great Learning and Doctrine of the Mean comprise the traditional Confucian canon known as the "Four Books," which was the educational core of traditional China. These two short texts served as summary guides to Confucian self-cultivation, and were memorized by children at the first satge of education. This scholarly translation is intended for both specialists and general readers. It primarily aims to elucidate the intellectual significance of individual passages and to highlight the way philosophical themes interact within the two texts. It is intended to provide open-access online materials, to be freely used or modified by individuals or by teachers employing them in a not-for-profit context.
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    Mencius: Translation, Commentary, and Notes
    (2016) Eno, Robert
    The Mencius is a collection of statements and discussions attributed to the early Chinese thinker, Mencius (c. 380 - c. 300 BCE). Mencius is often considered the first major thinker to elaborate the ideas of Confucius, who lived about two centuries earlier. This scholarly translation is intended for both specialists and general readers. It primarily aims to elucidate the intellectual significance of individual passages and to highlight the way philosophical themes interact within the text. It is intended to provide open-access online materials, to be freely used or modified by individuals or by teachers employing them in a not-for-profit context.