IDAH Workshop Series

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    Why use Digital Methods in Arts & Humanities Research?
    (2022-08-26) Shahidi, Pouyan; Elias, Vanessa
    A hands-on workshop on approaches and tools for digital research. This hands-on workshop will introduce you to approaches and tools for conducting digital arts and humanities research. We will begin with an overview of three areas of digital methods research: 1. text analysis 2. network analysis 3. mapping analysis Attendees will then have an opportunity to explore each of these tools and experience how digital methods can support their research needs.
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    Scholarly Communications in Digital Arts & Humanities
    (2019-09-27) Dalmau, Michelle; Craig, Kalani L.
    While we often think about the end form - website, digital journal, online resource - when we talk about digital scholarly communications, the work of digital arts and humanities publishing starts at the very beginning of a project. we will walk participants through what digital publications are (moving behind articles and monographs to peer-reviewed datasets and visualizations), how to present these in peer-review and promotion settings, and how to craft a project that takes these publication types and needs to account during the early, mid, and late- research stages. From practical data-management and storage concerns to the more intellectually challenging questions of how to frame the disciplinary outcomes of digital projects to our readers and peers, we will send participants home with a project plan and set of campus resources to support that plan.
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    Data for Digital Arts and Humanities Research
    (2019-09-20) Duke, Sara; Dalmau, Michelle
    Digital methods such as mapping, data visualization and network analysis offer opportunities to interrogate, explore, and answer research questions. What underlies each of these digital methods are data and the processes required to translate arts and humanities evidence into manipulatable data structures. In this workshop, we will explore the concept of “collections as data” and the implications of data normalization to facilitate computational based research or creative outputs. We will discuss the types of decisions you'll encounter when representing your humanities evidence in a digital environment and best practices for structuring your research data for use in a number of digital tools.
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    Why Use Digital Methods in Arts and Humanities Classrooms?
    (2019-09-13) Dalmau, Michelle; Craig, Kalani L.
    We're all buried in the digital world when we work on our own arts & humanities projects - whether it's reading the digital copy of an article, snapping smartphone photos of related work, or collaborating with editors over email. When these digital environments are harnessed thoughtfully and critically, we can use digital methods to showcase the research and creative work we do every day in our classrooms. This workshop will explore classroom-based digital activities that provide students with hands-on experience using mapping, data mining, network analysis, data visualization, and 3D rendering to support arts & humanities questions. We'll also engage participants in several white-board and sticky-note versions of these activities that use analog methods to enhance understanding of the digital world in which our students move.
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    Why Use Digital Methods in Arts and Humanities Research
    (2019-09-06) Craig, Kalani L.; Dalmau, Michelle
    Digital image manipulation, social network analysis and data mining can change our perceptions of the world around us, but they also require careful critical use. This presentation will take arts & humanities practitioners through mapping, data mining, network analysis, data visualization, 3D rendering, computationally aided vision and other digital methods in a variety of disciplines and tachle some of the critical issues for digital arts & humanities practitioners. We'll also provide a clear list of IU resources that can support these efforts. Finally, we'll all engage in a practical white-board-based activity that doesn't require digital tools to demonstrate how analog methods can enhance understanding of some of these digital-methods applications in a variety of environments (including the classroom).
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    Project Management Through Poster Design
    (2019-03-29) Borgo Ton, Mary
    Giving a poster presentation for a class or a conference? In the throes of a research project and need some clarity? This workshop explores poster design as a tool for organizing your research and presenting the results. We’ll discuss project management techniques that not only lead to dynamic and engaging posters but can also help you write papers, articles, and strong grant applications. We’ll share tips for designing your poster as well as identify easy-to-use design tools and on-campus printing resources. Bring a project or an idea to practice with!
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    Network Analysis and Geography
    (2019-02-01) Story, Daniel; Craig, Kalani L.
    Want to visualize and study a network in geographic space? We'll do a hands-on exercise with the powerful network analysis software Gephi. Learn about what files Gephi needs to create a network, some basic visualization and analysis options, and how to locate points in your network in geographic space. Participants will need a laptop with Gephi already installed.
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    Introduction to Network Analysis Tools
    (2019-01-25) Borgo Ton, Mary; Craig, Kalani L.
    Interested in using network analysis in your research or teaching? Come to this hands-on session where we will deal with the basics of cleaning and formatting your data and loading it into the simple network visualization app Google Fusion Tables. We'll conclude by discussing (and demonstrating) how this as well as analog approaches to network analysis can work in the classroom. Participants will need a laptop.
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    FrankensTEIn: Teaching Archival Material through Mark-Up
    (2018-10-30) Borgo Ton, Mary
    How do we encourage students to read material closely and carefully? What can mark-up show us about the content and context of archival material? This workshop discusses TEI, an internationally-recognized mark-up language, as a framework for analyzing literature, historical documents, and images. We'll use a paper-based activity to explore the manuscript of Frankenstein with a particular focus on the content and editorial history of Mary Shelley's classic novel. No prior experience with mark-up languages needed! Presented by Mary Borgo Ton.
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    The Franken Assignment: Going Beyond the Essay
    (2018-10-23) Borgo Ton, Mary
    Are you eager to try new forms of assignments but are not sure where to start? Looking for resources to help students build engaging and interactive final projects? In this workshop, we'll explore alternatives to the essay, ranging from digital maps to interactive digital posters to video and multimedia. Like essays, these assignments give students the opportunity to demonstrate their mastery of course material, but they go one step further by helping students learn and refine digital skills. As we consider examples, we'll discuss best practices for designing assignment instructions and grading rubrics as well as identify local resources for training, tools, and equipment. Presented by Mary Borgo Ton.
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    What Can Mapping and Spatial Analysis Do for You?
    (2018-09-21) Story, Daniel
    Digital mapping offers a variety of options that range in complexity from dropping a point on your smartphone's mapping application to analyzing statistical differences in different geographies to warping geography for historical or artistic purposes. In addition to learning digital mapping methodology for humanist and social sciences research, and adapting mapping tools for artistic practice, we will discuss the critical application of these tools and how they can be used effectively in the classroom.
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    What Can Networks Do For Me?
    (2018-09-14) Craig, Kalani L.; Kloster, David
    Network analysis provides a data-driven analysis and visualization exploration of relationships in digital arts & humanities, but within that umbrella is a variety of approaches to understanding interaction between elements of a system. We'll use your research question to help you think through how these relationships might work in a network analysis of your own and demonstrate how an in-classroom network-analysis activity can also help your students see relationships unfold in your discipline.
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    Data Mining for Humanists
    (2018-08-30) Craig, Kalani L.; Dalmau, Michelle; Gniady, Tassie
    From the open, largely unstructured text of the novel, to the structured world of social-network entries, to the automated comparison of photographs on a pixel-by-pixel basis, data mining has a broad set of applications for arts & humanities folks. We'll use your research question or object as the entry point to make sense of the world of data mining and send you home with an activity you can adapt and use to introduce your students to data mining in your discipline.
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    Introduction to Digital Methods: An Overview of Digital Arts and Humanities
    (2018-08-24) Craig, Kalani L.; Dalmau, Michelle; Gniady, Tassie
    Digital image manipulation, social network analysis, and data mining can change our perceptions of the world around us, but they also require careful, critical use. This presentation will take arts & humanities practitioners through mapping, data mining, network analysis, data visualization, 3D rendering, computationally aided vision, and other digital methods in a variety of disciplines and tackle some of the critical issues for digital arts and humanities practitioners.
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    Intro to Humanities Data: The Path to Complex Visualizations and Statistics
    (2018-01-30) Partlow, Mia; Craig, Kalani L.
    At times more complex data visualizations are necessary to communicate your argument and explore the multiple dimensions of your dataset. This hands-on session will start you down the path towards employing statistical methods to communicate your argument, and will give you a chance to bring your own data and work through options for visualizations. During the workshop we will use two sample datasets to discuss how they were prepared and structured to enable comparison with regression analysis. We'll discuss regression analysis and how you can compare two datasets in a way that ensures you're getting useful information.
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    Intro to Humanities Data: Simple Visualizations for Complex Arguments
    (2018-01-23) Giroux, Stacey; Partlow, Mia
    There are many tools and platforms for creating data visualizations, but in order to ensure they communicate in an effective way, your visualizations must be grounded in the appropriate quantitative methods. In this workshop, we will present some problematic humanities datasets and case studies, and use them to walk through the structure and assumptions your data will need to meet in order to create effective data visualizations. Introductory quantitative methods and vocabularies will be presented.
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    Intro to Humanities Data: Transforming Evidence into Data
    (2018-01-16) Dalmau, Michelle; Partlow, Mia
    Digital tools for mapping, data visualization, and network analysis offer opportunities to discover, answer, and present research for scholars working in the arts and humanities. But these methods require moving your evidence and research into a data structure appropriate for your chosen tool. In this workshop, we'll discuss the types of decisions you'll encounter when representing your humanities evidence in a digital environment and best practices for structuring your research data for use in a number of digital tools.
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    Choosing a Digital Method: Networks
    (2017-09-14) Craig, Kalani L.
    Network analysis provides a data-driven analysis and visualization exploration of relationships in digital arts & humanities, but within that umbrella is a variety of approaches to understanding interaction between elements of a system. We'll use your research question to help you think through how these relationships might work in a network analysis of your own and demonstrate how an in-classroom network-analysis activity can also help your students see relationships unfold in your discipline.​ This workshop was part of the Choosing a Digital Methods series from the Institute for Digital Arts & Humanities.
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    Choosing a Digital Method: Making Digital Objects
    (2017-09-21) Craig, Kalani L.; Gniady, Tassie
    From installations overlaid on the world around us to reprints of otherwise inaccessible archaeological finds that we can handle at will, digital objects help us interact with and understand the world differently. This workshop will walk through a wide variety of digital-making methods, from the 3D scanning of real world objects to laser cut mixed-media structures, and offer a clear view of the analog skills that underpin these digital approaches. We'll use your research question or object as the entry point to make sense of the world of digital making and rendering, and we’ll also send you home with an activity that will help you bring digital making into your classroom. This presentation was part of a series of workshops offered by the Institute for Digital Arts and Humanities called Choosing a Digital Method.
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    Choosing a Digital Method: Data Mining
    (2017-08-31) Craig, Kalani L.
    Data mining encompasses a several different approaches to exploring large swaths of information, from the open largely unstructured text of the novel to the structured world of social-network entries to the automated comparison of photographs on a pixel-by-pixel basis. We'll use your research question or object as the entry point to make sense of the world of data mining and send you home with an activity you can adapt and use to introduce your students to data mining in your discipline