Guidebooks - IGS

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    Geomorphology and groundwater hydrology of the Mitchell Plain and Crawford Upland in southern Indiana
    (Indiana Geological & Water Survey, 1965) Gray, Henry H.; Powell, Richard L.
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    A Field Guide to the Mt. Carmel Fault of Southern Indiana
    (Indiana Geological & Water Survey, 1972) Shaver, Robert H.; George, Austin S.
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    Cave and karst hydrology: A field trip through Owen, Monroe, and Lawrence Counties, Indiana
    (Indiana Geological & Water Survey, 2015) Lee, Florea J.; Frushour, Samuel S.
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    Karst Geology and Hydrology of the Spring Mill Lake and Lost River Drainage Basins in Southern Indiana
    (Indiana Geological & Water Survey, 2003) Bassett, John L.; Hasenmueller, Nancy R.; Powell, Richard L.; Rexroad, Carl Buckner; Buehler, Mark A.
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    G429 Field Geology in the Rocky Mountains
    (Indiana Geological Survey, 1962) Hendrix, Thomas E.
    The Department of Geology at Indiana University offers course G429 Field Geology in the Rocky Mountains as a part of its geologic training program and a requirement for the Bachelor of Science degree. This guidebook is intended to provide basic information about the geology along the route from Bloomington to the Field Station during the first part of the course.
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    Salem LImestone and Associated Formations in South-Central Indiana
    (Indiana Geological Survey, 1964) Perry, Thomas G.; Smith, Ned M.; Wayne, William J.
    Both the geologist and the layman have recognized the excellence of the Salem as a dimension stone for more than a century. In recent years the Salem limestone has attracted the attention of petroleum geologists, some of whom may not have had the opportunity of studying surface exposures of this formation.
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    Rocks Associated With the Mississippian-Pennsylvanian Unconformity in Southwestern Indiana
    (Indiana Geological Society, 1957) Gray, Henry H.; Dawson, T.A.; McGregor, Duncan J.; Perry, T.G.; Wayne, William J.
    The purpose of this field conference is to acquaint participants with strata that are associated with the Mississippian-Pennsylvanian unconformity in southwestern Indiana. Criteria which aid in distinguishing between Mansfield strata of Pottsville (early Pennsylvanian) age and classic formations of Chester (late Mississippian) age will receive considerable attention in discussions at evening meetings and on the outcrop. Inspection of limestone and sandstone quarries will afford an insight into the economic products of Chester and Mansfield rocks.
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    Stratigraphy Along the Mississippian-Pennsylvanian Unconformity of Western Indiana
    (Department of Geology, Indiana University, 1950) Esarey, R.E.; Bieberman, D.F.; Bieberman, R.A.
    The Mississippian-Pennsylvanian unconformity is the most pronounced and extensive break in the Paleozoic rocks of the Eastern Interior Basin. During the long erosional interval Mississippian beds were truncated and a topographic surface of considerable relief was developed. Pennsylvanian sediments rest on Upper Chester beds in southwestern Indiana, on Meremacian limestones in midwestern Indiana and on Osagian and upper Devonian beds in northwestern Indiana. Outcrops selected for the 1950 Field Conference show the Mississippian-Pennsylvanian unconformity and the stratigraphy along the unconformity in michvestern Indiana. Basal Pennsylvanian beds will be seen resting on Lower Chester, Ste. Genevieve, St. Louis, Salem, Harrodsburg, and Borden rocks representing a truncation of approximately 260 feet of sediments.
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    Ordovician Stratigraphy, and the Physiography of Part of Southeastern Indiana
    (Indiana Geological Survey, 1953) Patton, John B.; Perry, Thomas G.; Wayne, William J.
    Within recent years field conferences sponsored by the Geological Survey, Indiana Department of Conservation, and the Department of Geology, Indiana University, have reviewed outstanding exposures and of parts of the Silurian, Devonian, Mississippian, and Pennsylvanian systems in southern Indiana. This conference is concerned, in part, with the stratigraphy and paleontology of the Ordovician rocks exposed in southeastern Indiana.
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    Excursions in Indiana Geology
    (Indiana Geological Survey, 1966) Burger, Ann M.; Rexroad, Carl B.; Schneider, Allan F.; Shaver, Robert H.
    Our purpose on these excursions arranged for the 58th meeting of the Association of American State Ge ologists is to bring about an awareness of Indiana geology and its attraction. Although our State lacks a Grand Canyon and production of glamour metals, features which in themselves would assure success of a field trip, it nevertheless offers many geologic challenges--challenges that we shall in part take up during these two days.
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    Sedimentation and stratigraphy of the Devonian rocks of southeastern Indiana
    (Indiana Geological Survey, 1955-09) Murray, Haydn H.
    Devonian rocks in southern Indiana have presented many problems of correlation; their stratigraphy has been studied during recent years by T. A. Dawson and John B. Patton. General conditions of sedimentation of the Devonian rocks are reviewed in this guidebook by Haydn H. Murray. Other aspects of the Devonian rocks and the general area of the conference also are discussed; these reports include geochemistry, economic geology, and the physiography and Pleistocene history. Staff members of the Indiana Geological Survey and the Department of Geology, Indiana University, will talk briefly at each of the scheduled stops; they will review such aspects of the chemical composition, petrology, mineralogy, and stratigraphic nomenclature as are most applicable to the locality and exposure.
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    Excursions in Indiana Geology
    (Indiana Geological Survey, 1966-05) Burger, Ann M.; Rexroad, Carl B.; Schneider, Allan F.; Shaver, Robert H.
    Indiana lies wholly within the Central Lowland Province and thus calls to mind widespread, thin, nearly flat-lying Paleozoic rocks, major unconformities, and extensive plains. These features express epeirogenic submergences of the central part of the continent, long periods of general stability, and, nevertheless, repeatedly interrupted episodes of sedimentation and landform sculpture. Outstanding among these episodes was continental glaciation that carried to the Ohio River. Receiving ice from two principal directions the State's surface nearly everywhere attests to its latest experience, most obviously in the form of a great till plain that is interrupted in its gross appearance by end moraines, valley trains, and ice-contact deposits. Structurally, the State lies athwart a broad crestal area, the Cincinnati Arch, which separates the Michigan Basin on the north from the Illinois Basin on the southwest. Some structural instability, manifest as long ago as Precambrian time, is evident in such sedimentational or second-rank structural features as lithofacies, Silurian-Devonian and Mississippian-Pennsylvanian unconformities that change both locally and regionally in magnitude, and faulting. The more recent erosional record reflects structural history as well, and Paleozoic rocks from middle Ordovician to middle Pennsylvanian in age crop out at the bedrock surface according to their order of superposition. The Paleozoic units west and south of the Cincinnati Arch have special interest on these excursions. Their truncated edges, having differing resistances, are expressed alternately by open vales of gentle relief and uplands consisting of partly dissected westward-facing dip slopes and rugged forested scarps. Within easy range of Bloomington we can demonstrate much of the variety of geologic form characteristic of the State. Crossing the regional strike and the boundary between driftless and glaciated areas, the first day's excursion (inside front cover) is generally eastward to traverse bedrock of Mississippian to Silurian age and drifts assigned to the Kansan, Illinoian, and Wisconsin Stages. It emphasizes the State's most widely known natural product, the Indiana Limestone, and relationships of physiography to bedrock and drift. The second day's excursion (inside back cover) is northwestward from Bloomington and crosses younger bedrock (to middle Pennsylvanian in age). It emphasizes the Mississippian-Pennsylvanian unconformity, stratigraphic relationships of drifts, and some of the newest methods of coal mining and land reclamation.
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    Stratigraphy of the Silurian Rocks of Northern Indiana
    (Indiana Geological Survey, 1961-05) Shaver, Robert H.
    The Tenth Indiana Geologic Field Conference treats the stratigraphy of the Silurian rocks that lie between the Cincinnatian rocks and the bedrock surface in the rectangular area whose corners are defined by Cass, Allen, Randolph, and Hancock Counties, Ind. The area forms part of the Tipton Till Plain and is mantled by Wisconsin tills of the Tazewell and Cary Substages. Thus, well logs and cores are essential to an interpretation of the bedrock stratigraphy, but the eight exposures in the itinerary nearly span the Niagaran and Cayugan? Series as known in Indiana. Lowermost Silurian rocks, not exposed in the area, are assigned to the Brassfield Limestone. Three principal post-Brassfield pre-Mississinewa stratigraphic units are here called “lower Niagaran rocks” and are thought to be correlatives of the Osgood Formation and Laurel Limestone, the Waldron Shale, and the Louisville Limestone of southern Indiana. These rocks are present at the bedrock surface in the southeastern and eastern parts of the conference area. Progressively younger rocks are found westward and northward and are assigned to the Mississinewa Shale, the Liston Creek Limestone, the Huntington Dolomite, and the Kokomo Limestone. The Huntington Dolomite of common usage consists of lower Niagaran rocks, generally bedded, in the eastern and southeastern parts of the area and of upper Niagaran rocks, commonly reef facies, in the northern part. The so-called New Corydon Limestone of Huntington County is in the upper part of the Niagaran, but the New Corydon type exposures in Jay County lie stratigraphically well below the Mississinewa Shale. The Kokomo Limestone in its type area is assigned to the Cayugan, but its age and the unconformity that has been described at its base remain questionable. The rocks near Fort Wayne that have been called “Kokomo” are thought to be early-middle Devonian in age. They rest upon rocks of an upper Niagaran reef facies in the one exposure. Southeastward along the Silurian-Devonian contact in the western part of the area Devonian rocks rest upon progressively older Silurian strata, and most of the Mississinewa and younger Niagaran rocks are absent from the southern part. The historical development of stratigraphic terminology and the latest stratigraphic data suggest that the present usages of names for the following rock units in the conference area are less than satisfactory and that revision and redefinition may follow definitive study: Brassfield Limestone, lower Niagaran rocks, Huntington Dolomite, and New Corydon Limestone. Much of the fossil evidence bearing upon early correlations consists unsatisfactorily of species lists that had grown from author to author and through stratigraphic revisions. Many species, from nontypical exposures but presumably characterizing the faunal type, were added after stratigraphic identification had been made by means of lithostratigraphy; nearly half of the classic fossil localities are here assigned new stratigraphic positions. The fauna from the Mississinewa Shale and younger Niagaran strata is thought to be Lockport and Guelph in age.
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    Rocks Associated with the Mississippian-Pennsylvanian Unconformity in Southwestern Indiana
    (Indiana Geological Survey, 1957-10) Gray, Henry H.; Dawson, Thomas A.; McGregor, Duncan, Jr.; Perry, Thomas G.; Wayne, William J
    The purpose of this field conference is to acquaint participants with strata that are associated with the Mississippian-Pennsylvanian boundary in southwestern Indiana. Criteria which aid in distinguishing between Mansfield strata of Pottsville (early Pennsylvanian) age and clastic formations of Chester (late Mississippian) age will receive considerable attention in discussions at evening meetings and on the outcrop. Inspection of limestone and sandstone quarries will afford an insight into the economic products of Chester and Mansfield rocks. Participants may collect fossils at many of the stops.
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    The Salem Limestone and Associated Formations in South-Central Indiana
    (Indiana Geological Survey, 1954-05) Perry, Thomas G.; Smith, Ned M.; Wayne, William J.
    This field conference was organized to promote a better understanding of the geology of the Salem limestone and associated formations and the physiography of the region in which these rocks are exposed. The conference has been limited to a tract which displays the characteristic lithologies and relationships of the Salem. Both the geologist and the layman have recognized the excellence of the Salem as a dimension stone for more than a century. In recent years the Salem limestone has attracted the attention of petroleum geologists, some of whom may not have had the opportunity of studying surface exposures of this formation. The stops and their sequence have been carefully chosen to present a unified view of the geology of the Salem and associated formations; features of stratigraphic, economic, and paleontologic interest will be seen. Participants will have the opportunity not only of examining the Salem limestone but also of studying a significant part of the Harrodsburg and St. Louis limestones and a complete section of the Ste. Genevieve limestone. The Aux Vases, Paoli, and Beaver Bend formations of early Chester age also may be observed. In order that participants may learn more about the geology of the conference area, a short summary of its physiography and many physiographic notations in the road log have been included in the guidebook.
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    Ordovician Stratigraphy and the Physiography of Part of Southeastern Indiana
    (Indiana Geological Survey, 1953-05) Patton, John B.; Perry, Thomas G.; Wayne, William J.
    This field trip guidebook discusses the stratigraphy and paleontology of the Ordovician rocks exposed in southeastern Indiana. Ordovician rocks in southern Indiana are exposed in a region that is stimulating to physiographers and Pleistocene geologist. Consequently, in addition to the stratigraphy and paleontology of the Ordovician bedrock, this conference directs attention to prominent physiographic features in this area, many of which owe their origin to Pleistocene glaciation, and to concepts regarding their development. Ordovician rocks in southern Indiana are paleontologically attractive because they are so richly fossiliferous. Well-preserved specimens maybe readily collected in weathered exposures and in the soft shales of the Cincinnatian (Upper Ordovician) series. Southeastern Indiana has not yielded mineral commodities as plentifully as other parts of the state. Nevertheless, two stops and several observation points along the route of the caravan draw attention to some of the industrial minerals found in this area. This conference is designed to present as coherent a view as time will permit of the geology of southeastern Indiana. The stops have been carefully selected to show features of stratigraphic, paleontologic, physiographic, or economic interest. Informal discussion among participants will contribute greatly to the success of the conference.
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    Pennsylvanian Geology and Mineral Resources of West Central Indiana
    (Indiana Geological Survey, 1951-05) Wier, Charles E.; Esarey, Ralph E.
    During the period of oil and gas development in the 1950s, many petroleum geologists became interested in Pennsylvanian stratigraphy in Indiana. They hoped that the attitude of some of the key beds in the Pennsylvanian might indicate location of domes in deeper oil producing horizons. The sponsors organized this conference to give petroleum geologists, coal producers, clay producers, and other interested persons a better understanding of Pennsylvanian stratigraphy. The conference was planned to provide an opportunity to observe and discuss representative sections of the Pennsylvanian formations in western Indiana. Unfortunately, the best exposures are in the last cuts of strip mines, many of which are no longer accessible. Similar adjacent sections, however, may be available. The sections which have been selected are considered to be about average. The writers hope that the discussion both of the sections presented herein and of the problems connected with them will be mutually beneficial. The opportunity to become better acquainted and to exchange ideas is an important part of the conference.