Conference Papers and Presentations

Permanent link for this collectionhttps://hdl.handle.net/2022/586

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    Partnering with Libraries to Enhance Community Access to Scholarship
    (2024-04-17) Polley, Ted; Odell, Jere
    This presentation discusses ways that academic institutions can partner with their libraries to enhance community access to the scholarship produced on their campuses, much of which results from community-engaged projects. Specifically, the presenters outline how community access to scholarship supports the mission of a public research institution in an urban setting and the outcomes from a decade-plus partnership between the IUPUI University Library and the IUPUI Center for Translating Research Into Practice (TRIP). This presentation was part of an online panel discussion at the Engaged Scholarship Symposium hosted by the Lang Center for Civic and Social Responsibility at Swarthmore College on April 17, 2024.
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    Hepburn romanization revisited: two Japanese romanization styles and discovery
    (2024-05-23) Reichert, Kumiko
    Japanese romanization history begins in the late 19th century and keeps evolving in two styles, one of which is the Japanese-government preferred, the other of which is English-speaking-country preferred. The latest revision of the ALA-LC Japanese Romanization Table (2022) adopts these two styles: ISO 3602 and Hepburn romanization. Regardless of the adoption, a lot of Japanese romanization appearing in library metadata does not make good sense to English speakers because it is “phonologically incorrect” for them. The table is based on Hepburn romanization with some ISO 3602 utilized. In the real world, Hepburn romanization is prevalently used in personal, corporate-body or geographic names. Therefore, as far as Japanese romanization is concerned, the real-world scenario sometimes contradicts what the library metadata displays. In this presentation, the past literature and research on Hepburn romanization in library metadata as well as the history of Japanese romanization and the ALA-LC Japanese Romanization Table is reviewed and examined. In addition, the research goals and plans, and future research prospects are presented. The entire research outcome will shed light on the best approach to Japanese romanization for libraries, in order to improve discoverability for a variety of users and user needs.
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    Enduring partnership: a hybrid model of the LC-CEAL Internship Program
    (2023-03-16) Reichert, Kumiko; Leigh, Youngsim; Zoom, Jessalyn
    Council on East Asian Libraries (CEAL), the only group specialized for CJK librarianship and their professionals in the United States, in partnership with the Asian and Middle Eastern (ASME) Division, Library of Congress, hosts the Cataloging Internship Program, which provides training opportunities with those who may not have access to adequate cataloging training support in their own institutions, or with those who seek to gain greater competency in the formalities of their cataloging language. Although the program is offered annually, it had been suspended during the pandemic. It was resumed in 2022 as a hybrid model between the host institution and intern. This presentation covers the history, objectives and logistics of the program and experiences and lessons learned by the host coordinator and intern.
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    Area-studies cataloging workflow improvement with a temporary student assistant
    (2022-05-12) Reichert, Kumiko
    Herman B Wells Library, Indiana University Bloomington consists of the East Asian Collection, whose Korean collection size is the smallest among CJK. Due to the collection size, a student with Korean-language expertise has been assigned as a cataloging assistant these years. It is believed to be manageable for a student, who is properly trained and supervised, not only because of the collection size, but also because over half of it tends to have already been cataloged by the Library of Congress. This presentation covers stories about the experience of the supervisor, who was appointed for such a duty at Wells Library for the first time. It is focused on differences between training of those who did not have any prior library experience and training of those with experience, for instance, MLS students, library staff and librarians, based on the trainer’s experience. The presentation includes discussions on what to expect or what not to expect from a temporary student assistant, in terms of training and cataloging workflow, as well as what to focus on or how to set priorities when working with them. It provides insight into preparation for student supervision and cataloging workflow improvement, in addition to reconsideration of training methods.
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    Hepburn romanization revisited: two Japanese romanization styles and discovery
    (2024-03-06) Reichert, Kumiko
    Japanese romanization history begins in the late 19th century and keeps evolving in two styles, one of which is the Japanese-government preferred, the other of which is English-speaking-country preferred. The latest revision of the ALA-LC Japanese Romanization Table (2022) adopts these two styles: ISO 3602 and Hepburn romanization. Regardless of the adoption, a lot of Japanese romanization appearing in library metadata does not make good sense to English speakers because it is “phonologically incorrect” for them. The table is based on Hepburn romanization with some ISO 3602 utilized. In the real world, Hepburn romanization is prevalently used in personal, corporate-body or geographic names. Therefore, as far as Japanese romanization is concerned, the real-world scenario sometimes contradicts what the library metadata displays. In this presentation, the past literature and research on Hepburn romanization in library metadata as well as the history of Japanese romanization and the ALA-LC Japanese Romanization Table is reviewed and examined. In addition, the research goals and plans, and future research prospects are presented. The entire research outcome will shed light on the best approach to Japanese romanization for libraries, in order to improve discoverability for a variety of users and user needs.
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    Text Mining “Re-” in Victorian Poetry
    (2023-11-11) Mazel, Adam
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    Creative Means of Deconstruction: Teaching and Learning the UnEssay to Explore Artistic Modes of Inquiry in a Graduate LIS Course
    (American Library Association, 2022-06-25) Scheving, Caroline; Peters, Joshua; Krabbe, Marloes; Deogracias, Micaela; Carter, Sarah
    This visually-engaging poster presents a case study of an art librarianship graduate course in which students engaged in an UnEssay assignment. While many library and information science (LIS) graduates have undergraduate degrees in art history, fewer have degrees in studio arts, and therefore, less first-hand knowledge of artistic practices. This is problematic because approaches to artistic modes of inquiry vary significantly compared to predominantly text-based research practices used throughout other areas within the humanities. The UnEssay, as defined by Marc Kissel, gives students space to “choose not just the topic but the medium in which they can best present their ideas.” Students chose an area of interest within art librarianship and undertook a project which allowed them to express their learning by making something. The poster will include photos of student projects in various media, including fiber arts, GIS mapping, and collage. It will also share students’ reflective writing about their learning experience in which they share how their UnEssays related to specific competencies found in the "Art Libraries Society of North America (ARLIS/NA) Core Competencies for Art Information Professionals" publication as well as any new skills they learned creating their UnEssay project. Poster viewers will learn practical and theoretical impacts of assigning an UnEssay project at the graduate level. Viewers will also leave with an expanded knowledge of incorporating the UnEssay into a course design.
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    Faculty Publication Timelines: An Indiana University Service to Junior Faculty
    (Special Libraries Association, 2014-06-10) Noel, Robert E.; Batra, Urvashi
    Swain Hall library is one of 12 subject libraries on the Indiana University, Bloomington campus. Established in 1950, it has been the lifeline for Physics, Astronomy, Mathematics, Computer Science, and the School of Informatics. Apart from traditional information services, including collection development, examining faculty publishing activities has been one of our primary goals. We have received positive feedback from scholars and committees as we summarize those contributions to those unfamiliar with the science itself. We used Microsoft Excel to create these timelines, a YouTube describing how to do this can be found on the web with the title “Create a timeline in Microsoft Excel”. Timelines offered a condensed, single view of Publications, Citation count, and Journal Impact. The results of this analysis may assist committee member in compiling individual publications; and it may enable assessment committees in decisions related to faculty promotion and tenure. Citation databases consulted to build citation count for each journal article were: SCOPUS, Google Scholar, and Web Of Science.
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    How to Eat an Elephant: Strategies for Using Student Workers to Tackle Backlogs
    (2018-10-09) McClanahan, Allison; Johnson, Ryan; Ward, Sarah; Weaver, Lindsay
    This poster will address strategic hiring of students and creative ways of thinking and outreach to tackle challenging backlog projects, describing the following: determining the scope of the ATM’s nebulous backlog; seeking students with skills outside of the traditional music library skillset; implementing new procedures for capturing statistics. ATM students will also discuss their part of “the elephant in the archive”.
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    School of Informatics Fall, 2022 Borrowed Books, Pop-Up Library, 9/6-9/7/2022
    (2022-09-14) Noel, Robert E.
    Approximately 200 books from computer sciences and social sciences were included from the Sciences Library, the Wells Library, and the ALF. The majority of books were published over the past 5 years. Unlike most Informatics pop-up libraries, this pop-up included roughly half of its content from call number ranges outside computer science and coding texts. It also was approximately double in size than most pop-ups. An IUCAT search was conducted that narrowed the date range to 2018-2022, and included books with keywords “computing”, “analytics”, “big data”, and “intelligen*”. There were some small exceptions where older titles were included, e.g. python books from the past decade, and operations research titles from authors such as Stafford Beer. In addition, some new book titles entirely outside of computing, but related to science in general were also displayed. The following were titles checked out at the pop-out, largely by masters students in the School of Informatics, but included some undergraduates and a small number of faculty. While this is not representative of all new science titles collected on the Bloomington campus in the past five years, it is a good sample of what has been collected in "print”, as opposed to e-books. The results of this pop-up library can help us understand the types of books we may want to purchase in the future in both print and e-formats.
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    Web Accessibility in the Institutional Repository: Crafting User-Centered Submission Policies
    (NASIG 2020, 2020-06) McLaughlin, Margaret; Hoops, Jenny
    As web accessibility initiatives increase across institutions, it is important not only to reframe and rethink policies, but also to develop sustainable and tenable methods for enforcing accessibility efforts. For institutional repositories, it is imperative to determine the extent to which both the repository manager and the user are responsible for depositing accessible content. This presentation allows us to share our accessibility framework and help repository and content managers craft sustainable, long-term goals for accessible content in institutional repositories, while also providing openly available resources for short-term benefit.
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    Building a Foundation for Sustainable Library Publishing: Quantitative Tools & Practical Methods
    (Library Publishing Forum 2020, 2020-05-07) Hoops, Jenny; Tavernier, Willa
    As library publishing programs continue to expand, developing a sustainable framework for onboarding journals and publishing new content has become imperative. In 2019 the Indiana University Libraries open access publishing program reached over 50 journals. To cope with this workload, we recognized the need to develop a methodology for sustainable publishing. Up to that point, we onboarded new journals as soon as the editors were ready, and went to great lengths to accommodate new feature requests and technical changes. Meanwhile, library employees were spending a disproportionate amount of time on publishing maintenance and routine, repetitive editorial queries. To alleviate these issues, we developed a quantitative assessment for our journals that assigned points correlating to the number of work hours a given task took to complete. We then assessed all existing journals and decided on the amount of FTE workforce we could dedicate to journal publishing. This allowed us to calculate the number of points that could be added each quarter, and establish a queue system - any journals projected to exceed this amount would be onboarded in a future quarter. We also created new FAQs addressing common user issues. The strain on our department immediately lessened, and we have already seen a more consistent and sustainable workflow. This system also allowed us to set stable timelines to process requests, and focus on doing more collaborative work with editors rather than automatically completing tasks for them. This session will present a case study of the Indiana University Libraries Scholarly Communication department’s quantitative methods for onboarding and maintaining journals. Participants will have the opportunity to apply our methodology to their own programs, and brainstorm how to develop methodologies that would fit with their own needs and resources. We will also provide time to discuss long-term projections for library publishing programs.
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    Shedding Disciplinary Divides: Using an ethnographic AV collection across disciplines in student learning
    (2019-10-25) McClanahan, Allison
    The Archives of Traditional Music (ATM) at Indiana University holds collections from a breadth of disciplines such as Ethnomusicology, Popular Music, and Jazz, as well as non-music-focused disciplines such as Folklore, Anthropology, and African Studies. This scope of collections allows for bridging ethnographic disciplines with the wider academic scope, including arts and humanities. This presentation will discuss outreach efforts by ATM staff to engage students and faculty at Indiana University across various disciplines, examples of ways ATM collections have been utilized by faculty and students to engage student learning, and approaches to and design of class activities.
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    Into the Wild: Born Digital AV Preservation
    (2019-05-23) Shallcross, Mike
    Key considerations and issues related to the preservation of born-digital audiovisual materials.
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    Documenting Digital Forensics Workflows
    (2019-04-30) Shallcross, Mike
    In recent years, the digital preservation and archives communities have increasingly integrated forensics tools in workflows for the acquisition and ingest of content. While such tools help ensure the authenticity and integrity of content, the documentation of our workflows—what actions we’ve taken and when—are significant factors in capturing the digital provenance of archival materials. In this short presentation, I will discuss my work refining and extending Python scripts from the digital preservation community to create PREMIS metadata for actions such as disk image creation, forensic feature analysis, and file format identification.
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    Workflow Pain Points and Opportunities for Machine Learning
    (2019-07-25) Shallcross, Mike
    Overview of digital preservation ingest procedures used in the Indiana University Libraries's 'Born Digital Preservation Lab' with discussion of challenges and opportunities related to workflow development.
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    Bringing BitCurator Tools and Strategies to Windows
    (2019-10-24) Shallcross, Mike
    Indiana University started using the BitCurator Environment in 2015 and by 2017 staff had deployed two dedicated workstations in our Born Digital Preservation Lab. The benefits of this approach are no doubt obvious to members of the BitCurator community: in addition to a pre-installed suite of digital forensics and data analysis tools, the Linux-based operating system allowed staff to recognize and extract content from multiple file systems. At the same time, our local desktop support services were limited to Windows and so digital preservation staff were responsible for addressing hardware and software issues. As a result, when the workstations were scheduled for replacement in 2018, we elected to replace them with Windows machines and implement many of the tools found in the BitCurator Environment. In this presentation, I would like to share our approach to implementing a BitCurator-like environment on Windows and how we were able to adapt resources--in particular, Tim Walsh’s Brunnhilde and Disk Image Processor--to automate significant portions of our content migration and analysis workflows (and at the same time capture associated preservation metadata). While more work is needed to refine our procedures, our progress thus far highlights the value of a shared community of practice in the advancement of local digital preservation goals.
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    Open Educational Resources and Libraries: Current Trends and Future Directions
    (2018-09) Hare, Sarah
    Current undergraduate students are estimated to pay over $1,000 each academic year on their course materials, impacting students' ability to learn and engage with course content. This session provides an introduction to one potential solution to this issue, Open Educational Resources (OER). In addition to discussing the benefits of OER and the barriers to widespread adoption, the session provides an overview of the spectrum of ways that libraries are supporting OER creation and use. After providing some context, the session outlines important future directions for consideration, including pedagogy, government support, accessibility, and labor.
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    Taking the Leap: Experiences Planning and Implementing a Migration to OJS 3
    (2018-05) Hare, Sarah; Molls, Emma; Polley, Ted
    The Public Knowledge Project announced the release of Open Journal Systems (OJS) 3 in August 2016. In addition to a more streamlined interface OJS 3 offers important functionality, including more flexible roles, new plugins, and even the ability to operationalize XML-first publishing. However, almost two years after the official release, several library publishers have not yet migrated to the newest version of OJS. In addition to the technical support needed to successfully plan and execute the migration, implementation often involves extensive outreach to editors on system changes and new functionality. At the same time, library publishers that do decide to migrate often work in isolation, asking colleagues on listservs, Github, or other online forums for advice or information about their experience migrating. There are no formal community-developed outreach materials for library publishers to share communally and implement locally. This session, presented at the 2018 Library Publishing Forum, presents three case studies on the transition to OJS 3. One case study, from the University of Minnesota, explores the migration from bepress to OJS 3. Two others, from Indiana University and Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, explores migrating a multi-site instance from OJS 2 to OJS 3. Each case study is grounded in information about the library publishing program, timeline, size of the department, and level of technical support available. The presentation includes tangible outreach materials on the update. These include communication templates, training outlines, videos, and wikis created to support journal editors transition to OJS 3. The session also presents obstacles to success.