contributor.author: Fritz Kemmler

title.none: Blair, Anglo-Saxon England (Fritz Kemmler )

identifier.other: baj9928.0404.003 04.04.03

identifier.issn: 1096-746X

description.statementofresponsibility: Fritz Kemmler , Universitaet Tuebingen, fritz.kemmler@uni-tuebingen.de

publisher.none: .

date.issued: 2004

identifier.citation: Blair, Peter Hunter. An Introduction to Anglo-Saxon England, 3rd edition. Cambridge: Cambridge Univerity Press, 2003. Pp. xxxv, 384. ISBN: $29.00 0-521-53777-0.

type.none: Review

relation.ispartof: The Medieval Review

The Medieval Review 04.04.03

Blair, Peter Hunter. An Introduction to Anglo-Saxon England, 3rd edition. Cambridge: Cambridge Univerity Press, 2003. Pp. xxxv, 384. ISBN: $29.00 0-521-53777-0.

Reviewed by:

Fritz Kemmler
Universitaet Tuebingen
fritz.kemmler@uni-tuebingen.de

This third edition of a classic in Anglo-Saxon studies is really a reprint of the second edition (1977) with a "Preface to the Third Edition" (x) and an "Introduction: Changing perceptions of Anglo-Saxon history" (xvii-xxxv) both contributed by Simon Keynes. The book also contains a critical "Select Bibliography" (364-374) divided into eight sub-sections, including electronic resources but sadly omitting N. R. Ker's classic Catalogue of Manuscripts Containing Anglo-Saxon.

In his introduction Simon Keynes concentrates in particular on those areas of Anglo-Saxon studies in which progress has been made since the second edition of Blair's Introduction: e.g. archaeology, charters, laws, numismatics and the role of women in Anglo-Saxon society. Keynes also points out that some of the critical paradigms underlying Blair's book have moved from the centre to the periphery and that Anglo-Saxon history should be seen and evaluated in the context of (Western) European history. Indeed, this new introduction is a good and valuable guide for those readers who wish to explore this classic in Anglo-Saxon studies written, revised and updated in the second half of the twentieth century. They will find out that Blair's book remains a good point of departure in the first years of the twenty-first century.