contributor.author: Klaus Herbers

title.none: Gitlitz and Davidson, The Pilgrimage Road to Santiago: The Complete Cultural Handbook (Klaus Herbers)

identifier.other: baj9928.0110.002 01.10.02

identifier.issn: 1096-746X

description.statementofresponsibility: Klaus Herbers, Universitdt Erlangen-N|rnberg, hameixne@phil.uni-erlangen.de

publisher.none: .

date.issued: 2001

identifier.citation: Gitlitz, David and Linda Kay Davidson. The Pilgrimage Road to Santiago: The Complete Cultural Handbook. New York: St. Martin's Press, 2000. Pp. 439. ISBN: 0-312-25416-4.

type.none: Review

relation.ispartof: The Medieval Review

The Medieval Review 01.10.02

Gitlitz, David and Linda Kay Davidson. The Pilgrimage Road to Santiago: The Complete Cultural Handbook. New York: St. Martin's Press, 2000. Pp. 439. ISBN: 0-312-25416-4.

Reviewed by:

Klaus Herbers
Universitdt Erlangen-N|rnberg
hameixne@phil.uni-erlangen.de

Based on both theoretical and practical work, the volume presented by Gitlitz and Davidson represents a 'Handbook' in the literal sense, divided into two main parts: "The Road" (I) and "The Reference Points" (II).

The part on the main road to St. James is the most important chapter of the book. It does, however, not consider the different roads of pilgrimage in France leading south, but starts with a description of the various points of departure on the Spanish border, in the Pyrenees. From there on, the authors follow the most important stops on the way to Santiago de Compostela, providing a vast amount of historical background plus detailed information on which sights and monuments to visit. Furthermore, sections are devoted to the special pilgrimage traditions in these towns, and some detailed maps of the larger cities (e.g. of Burgos and Astorga) offer additional practical information for visitors. As a result, we get a very detailed impression of the journey across Nothern Spain to St. James of Compostelle, a city that belongs to the most important centres of pilgrimage in the Middle Ages.

The Reference Points in the second part are intended to present the reader with some basic general facts as referred to in the first past, through a glossary on different styles of art and architecture, alphabetical lists of artists, saints and religious iconography, and a time line of rulers and events.

The book concludes with a bibliography, to which one should add, at least, some of the newer Spanish editions (e.g. of Kunig von Vach), and the new transcription of the Liber Sancti Iacobi published in 1999. There are quite a few other important titles missing from the bibliographical section, the compilators of which obviously followed the guideline, Germanica non leguntur .

Nevertheless, this book will prove to be a very useful companion for anyone seriously interested in the road to St. James.